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Programs and Tours

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November 1



Friday, November 1, 8 pm - 10 pm
Apse

Exploring the artistic circle as creative milieu and engine with Professor Nadine Hubbs, author of The Queer Composition of America’s Sound, SMTD students and faculty perform works written by and for Virgil Thomson, Aaron Copland, and their friends, colleagues, loves, and muses. The SMTD@UMMA performance series is made possible in part by the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund. This concert is organized in partnership with UM's Lesbian-Gay-Queer Research Initiative (LGQRI). The exhibition Adolph Gottlieb: Sculptor was organized by the Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Foundation, New York. Lead support for UMMA’s installation is provided by the Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, the University of Michigan Health System, and the University of Michigan Credit Union.

categories: Performing Arts

November 2



Saturday, November 2, 1 pm - 4 pm
Multipurpose Room
Members: $38, Non-members: $45; all materials provided. Register online at annarborartcenter.org. Must register at least 3 days in advance.

Create a miniature shrine in celebration of Dia de Los Muertos with mixed media artist Michele Riddel Bagnasco. Honor a loved one, celebrate a personal experience or just create a vibrant vignette. Using a candy tin, paint and assemblage materials, you’ll create your own precious mini-alter to take home. Included are candy tins, unpainted plaster skulls, hearts and other decorative elements. Feel free to bring small personal objects or ephemera.

categories: Artmaking, Family

November 3

Guided Tour

Sunday, November 3, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent's approach and choice of objects is unique.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, November 3, 2 pm - 3 pm

UMMA has assembled a choice group of domestic design objects that will go on display this summer in a new dedicated design gallery. This gallery is an important component of the Museum’s rededication to modern and contemporary visual culture and to making its own twentieth- and twenty-first-century holdings more visible. Both design aficionados and novices may recognize some of the historic work on view. UMMA docents will introduce this exciting new installation to visitors in this tour.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

November 5



Tuesday, November 5, 3:30 pm - 5 pm
Multipurpose Room

Faculty and graduate students are invited to a Preview and Curriculum Development Workshop that looks forward to UMMA's exhibition of Doris Duke's Shangri La: Architecture, Landscape, and Islamic Art (January 25 - May 4, 2014). The first exhibition to present Duke's estate and its collection of Islamicate arts to audiences throughout the continental United States, Doris Duke's Shangri La features ceramics, textiles, paintings, tile panels, and full-scale architectural elements, juxtaposed with historic photographs and drawings that dramatically demonstrate the symbiotic relationship between the house and its collections. The exhibition also includes new works by contemporary artists who participated in the Shangri La Artists-in-Residence program and produced art in response to Doris Duke's collections. Led by Professor Christiane Gruber (History of Art) and doctoral student Ashley Dimmig, this event will introduce participants to the objects in the show. It will explore the many themes through which university instructors can integrate visits and projects with the exhibition into their teaching plans for Winter 2014. Major themes include the varieties and histories of Islamic visual cultures, the influence of Duke’s collection on modern design, Orientalism and the history of the discipline of Islamic Art, the culture of collecting and display, women's artistic patronage in the twentieth century, and the intersections between traditionalism, revivalism, and modernism in Duke's Shangri-La. Instructors and researchers from all disciplines are invited to bring their own ideas and contribute to what should be a fascinating and productive workshop. This faculty workshop is supported by a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Special Events





Tuesday, November 5, 6 pm - 7:30 pm
Apse

Reception and book signing in the UMMA Forum from 5-6 pm Edward Hirsch, a MacArthur Fellow, has published The Living Fire: New and Selected Poems (2010), which brings together thirty-five years of poetry from seven previous collections, including For the Sleepwalkers (1981), Wild Gratitude (1986), which won the National Book Critics Circle Award, The Night Parade (1989), Earthly Measures (1994), On Love (1998), Lay Back the Darkness (2003), and Special Orders (2008). He has also written five prose books, including How to Read a Poem and Fall in Love with Poetry (1999), a national bestseller, Poet's Choice (2006), and Magical Devices: A Poet's Glossary (forthcoming 2014). He edits the series "The Writer's World" (Trinity University Press). He has edited Theodore Roethke's Selected Poems (2005) and co-edited The Making of a Sonnet: A Norton Anthology (2008). He has received a Guggenheim Fellowship and the American Academy of Arts and Letters Award for Literature, amongst other awards. He taught at Wayne State University and the University of Houston, and now serves as president of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell('64). For more information, please see http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp.

categories: Writers Series

November 6



Wednesday, November 6, 4 pm - 7:30 pm
Multipurpose Room
Galleries
Advance registration required: jannwes@umich.edu

Teaching with Photographs will celebrate the opening of UMMA's new photography gallery. This workshop for K-12 teachers will explore historical and aesthetic approaches to UMMA's photographs as well as rhetorical uses of images. Participants will enjoy a private gallery talk of the inaugural exhibition, Brett Weston Landscapes, and an introduction to the extensive and historically comprehensive UMMA photography collection. Each speaker will propose ways to use photographs in the classroom across disciplines. As always, we will have light refreshments, a hands-on activity with take-home lesson plans. Lead support for the exhibition Brett Weston Landscapes is provided by the Lois Zenkel Photographic Exhibitions Fund. The related K-12 workshop is made possible by the Monroe-Brown Fund.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program





Wednesday, November 6, 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Lecture by Ron Kagan, Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer, The Detroit Zoological Institute Zoos are unique societal intersections where nature, science, and human values converge. Like most museums, we conserve artifacts. The zoo and aquarium community strives to advance the conservation of thousands of living species and animals. Effective conservation efforts that advance populations and the welfare of species do not necessarily advance the welfare of individuals. Is it ethical to ignore individuals to conserve species? Furthermore, picking which species we conserve often means de facto picking which species may ultimately become extinct. How do we sort through those ethical dimensions? For many museums the ethical considerations of the collection or objects (for example, a work of art) center around ownership. For zoos the ethical choices truly often revolve around life and death. Though zoo environments are predator-free, they are also captive spaces, limiting and foreign to animals that are often denied basic freedoms. This presentation addresses the complex and significant ethical issues confronting those who take seriously their responsibility to protect and optimize the lives of their animal collections – what we now call the living resident population. Ron Kagan is the Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer of the Detroit Zoological Society, a position he has held since 1992. Kagan's career spans 35 years working in zoos including the Dallas Zoo and Aquarium and the Jerusalem Zoo at Hebrew University. Throughout Kagan's tenure at the Detroit Zoo, he has been steadfast in his commitment to treat the animals with respect and empathy. The zoo has transitioned away from a more traditional approach to become a national leader in the compassionate treatment of animals in captivity. The zoo has also participated in the rescue of thousands of animals and been able to provide them with a much improved quality of life. Kagan was educated at Hebrew University, and his dedication to the proper care of animals is a lifelong commitment for him.

categories: Artists and Curators

November 7



Thursday, November 7, 5:10 pm - 6 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Edward Hirsch, a MacArthur Fellow, has published The Living Fire: New and Selected Poems (2010), which brings together thirty-five years of poetry from seven previous collections, including For the Sleepwalkers (1981), Wild Gratitude (1986), which won the National Book Critics Circle Award, The Night Parade (1989), Earthly Measures (1994), On Love (1998), Lay Back the Darkness (2003), and Special Orders (2008). He has also written five prose books, including How to Read a Poem and Fall in Love with Poetry (1999), a national bestseller, Poet's Choice (2006), and Magical Devices: A Poet’s Glossary (forthcoming 2014). He edits the series "The Writer's World"; (Trinity University Press). He has edited Theodore Roethke's Selected Poems (2005) and co-edited The Making of a Sonnet: A Norton Anthology (2008). He has received a Guggenheim Fellowship and the American Academy of Arts and Letters Award for Literature, amongst other awards. He taught at Wayne State University and the University of Houston, and now serves as president of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell ('64). For more information, please see http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp.

categories: Writers Series

November 8

Guided Tour

Friday, November 8, 12:15 pm - 12:45 pm

Designed specifically for the lunch hour, UMMA staff and student docents will offer thirty minutes of conversation about art in the UMMA galleries around fresh, entertaining, and seasonal themes such as, love, heroes, food, and more. Meet at the Information Desk.
 

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours





Friday, November 8, 5 pm - 8 pm
Galleries

In response to visitor feedback, the Museum will stay open after 5 pm on select Fridays over the upcoming months. All of UMMA’s galleries and special exhibitions will remain open until 8 pm for the kickoff of this exciting series. As always, admission is free.

Upcoming dates for UMMA Fridays After 5 include:
November 8, 2013
February 21, 2014
April 25, 2014
July 18, 2014

UMMA Fridays After 5 is generously supported by Comerica Bank.

categories: Special Events





Friday, November 8, 7 pm - 8 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

One MFA student of fiction and one of poetry, each introduced by a peer, will read their work. The Mark Webster Reading Series presents emerging writers in a warm and relaxed setting. We encourage you to bring your friends-a Webster reading makes for an enjoyable and enlightening Friday evening.

categories: Writers Series

November 9



Saturday, November 9, 11:15 am - 11:45 am

Children ages four to seven are invited to hear a story in the galleries. Student docents and UMMA staff will bring art to life as they read stories related to the art on display and invite responses from our youngest patrons. Each story is followed by a short art activity. Parents must accompany children. Siblings are welcome to join the group. Meet at the Information Desk.

categories: Family, Gallery Talks and Tours

November 10



Sunday, November 10, 11 am - 5 pm
Galleries

Today's emerging talents in architecture are redefining the profession with global practices that are digitally literate and operate at multiple scales of design. This liberation of scale has allowed architects to look at issues from interiors to urban planning in new and innovative ways. Nahyun Hwang and David Eugin Moon—principals of N H D M, a New York City based studio (and recent lecturers in architecture at the UM Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning), are representative of this new wave of architectural thinking. From the 2011 award-winning Nam June Paik Library in Yongin, South Korea, to the repurposing of abandoned modern skyscrapers in their 2012 (No) Stop Marconi proposal for Rotterdam, N H D M is a studio that is constantly exploring scale, purpose, program, function, and history to create a new sustainable framework. Comprised of videos, models, and drawings, the exhibition considers a selection of projects from 2001 to the present that reflects Hwang and Moon’s global design sensibility.



Lead support for this exhibition is provided by the Herbert W. and Susan L. JoheEndowment. Additional generous support is provided by Taubman College of Architecture + Urban Planning.


categories:



Guided Tour

Sunday, November 10, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent's approach and choice of objects is unique.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, November 10, 2 pm - 3 pm

Today's emerging talents in architecture are redefining the profession with global practices that are digitally literate and operate at multiple scales of design. This liberation of scale has allowed architects to look at issues from interiors to urban planning in new and innovative ways. Nahyun Hwang and David Eugin Moon—principals of N H D M studio—are representative of this new wave of architectural thinking. Docents will explore the scale, purpose, program, function, and history of the work of this exciting studio. 

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

November 14



Thursday, November 14, 6 pm - 7:30 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

CNN foreign affairs correspondent and UM alumna Jill Dougherty will give the keynote address for this year's History of Art Freer Symposium, "Arts of the Arab World Uprisings". Dougherty has traveled widely with former Secretary of State Hilary Clinton and reported from more than 50 countries including Afghanistan, Iraq, and North Korea. During the recent Middle East uprisings, images were disseminated through countless venues as demonstrators and others turned to using their cameras, photographs, computers, pens, and paints to create visualized forms of dissent while simultaneously communicating politicized messages and building records of the ongoing upheavals. The resulting flood of images of torture, violence, anger, frustration, joy, and hope resulted from participant observation and eyewitness journalism, in turn coalescing into a larger visual amalgam through the cybermedia. As communicative devices, images have played a key role in contesting the status quo, building group consensus, and securing support locally and internationally. This symposium explores these visual arts and other expressive media, bringing together internationally acclaimed journalists, writers, bloggers, activists, cinematographers, photographers, cartoonists, and scholars whose work explores or makes use of image-based modes of communication. More info at www.lsa.umich.edu/histart/ArtsOfTheArabWorldUprisings. This program is co-sponsored by UMMA. The conference is organized by Professors Christiane Gruber (History of Art) and Juan Cole.

http://www.lsa.umich.edu/histart/events/artsofthearabworlduprisings


categories: Special Events

November 15



Friday, November 15, 9 pm - 5 pm
4th Floor East Conference Room, Rackham Graduate School
915 E Washington St

Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Spring 2011 was a riveting moment across the Middle East. Beginning with popular demonstrations in Tunisia that resulted in the January ousting of longtime president Ben Ali, the uprisings subsequently spread to a number of other countries, including Egypt, Libya, Yemen, Bahrain, Iran, and Syria (where violence continues unabated today). These uprisings were dubbed the "Arab Spring" due to their timing and the hope for democratic change that they seemed to promise. Although they did not just take place in Arab lands and their courses remain unclear as various political parties continue to vie for power today, their images nevertheless have remained indelible in the minds of those who participated in demonstrations or watched the events unfold. This is especially the case for Egypt where televised reports - both past and ongoing - have allowed demonstrators to address both the Mubarak and Morsi regimes as well as an international viewership. Over and again, government-controlled modes of communication were circumvented as a number of other media allowed for an alternative (and arguably more accurate) recording of events on the ground. The dissemination of images trickled through countless venues as demonstrators and other individuals turned to using their own cameras, photographs, and paints to create visualized forms of dissent. This flood of images of torture, violence, anger, joy, and hope resulted from participant observation and eyewitness journalism, in turn coalescing into a larger visual amalgam through the cybermedia. This symposium explores the various roles and functions played by the visual arts and other expressive media in the recent Middle East Uprisings by bringing together internationally acclaimed and award-winning journalists, bloggers, activists, cinematographers, photographers, writers, and art historians. This collaborative enterprise seeks to bridge several disciplines within academia while also placing scholars in conversation with activists and journalists active on the ground. The conference is organized by Professors Christiane Gruber (History of Art) and Juan Cole (History and CMENAS).
http://www.lsa.umich.edu/histart/events/artsofthearabworlduprisings

categories: Writers Series

November 17

Guided Tour

Sunday, November 17, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent's approach and choice of objects is unique.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, November 17, 2 pm - 3 pm

Brett Weston (1911–1993) is one of the iconic photographers of the 20th century. The son of pioneer photographer, Edward Weston, Brett’s work asserts its own dynamic aesthetic which docents will share with visitors. His work consists of highly distilled views from nature, capturing the grandeur of sweeping landscape vistas but also close-up views that connect to abstract paintings being done at the same time.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

November 21



Thursday, November 21, 5:10 pm - 6 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Karen Russell's highly acclaimed 2011 novel Swamplandia was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, one of the New York Times 10 Best Books of 2011, and a recipient of the New York Public Library Young Lions Fiction Award. Her other work includes the short story collections St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves and her most recent, Vampires in the Lemon Grove, praised by NPR as “one of the most innovative, inspired short-story collections in the past decade.” Russell has been honored in the New Yorker's list of the 20 best writers under the age of 40, Granta's Best of Young American Novelists, and by the National Book Foundation's "5 Under 35" program. Three of her short stories have been selected for the Best American Short Stories volumes. Her stories have been featured in Best American Short Stories, Conjunctions, Granta, the New Yorker, Oxford American, and Zoetrope. She is the recipient of the Mary Ellen von der Heyden Berlin Prize and was a spring 2012 fellow at the American Academy in Berlin. The Janey Lack Readings are curated by the MFA students in creative writing in the Helen Zell Writers' Program. UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell('64). For more information, please see http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp.

categories: Writers Series





Thursday, November 21, 5:10 pm - 6 pm
Historic Theater, Michigan Theater
603 E. Liberty

Ann Arbor, MI 48104

Antony Gormley's sculptures, installations and public artworks investigate the relationship of the human body to space. His work has developed through a critical engagement with both his own body and those of others to confront fundamental questions of where human beings stand in relation to nature and the cosmos. Gormley's work has been widely exhibited throughout the UK and internationally including at the Venice Biennale and Documenta 8. He was awarded the Turner Prize, the South Bank Prize for Visual Art and made an Officer of the British Empire (OBE). He is an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects, an Honorary Doctor of the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of Trinity and Jesus Colleges, Cambridge. Established with the generous support of UM School of Art and Design alumna Penny W. Stamps, the Stamps Speaker Series brings respected emerging and established artists/designers from a broad spectrum of media to the School to conduct a public lecture and engage with students, faculty, and the larger University and Ann Arbor communities. Co-sponsored by the UM Museum of Art. Additional support is provided by Michigan Radio. Events in the Penny Stamps series are always free of charge and open to the public.

categories: Special Events

November 22



Friday, November 22, 7 pm - 8 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

One MFA student of fiction and one of poetry, each introduced by a peer, will read their work. The Mark Webster Reading Series presents emerging writers in a warm and relaxed setting. We encourage you to bring your friends—a Webster reading makes for an enjoyable and enlightening Friday evening.

categories: Writers Series

November 24

Guided Tour

Sunday, November 24, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent's approach and choice of objects is unique.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, November 24, 2 pm - 3 pm

One of the founding members of the Abstract Expressionists, Adolph Gottlieb (1903-1974) was an important presence in the artistic life of New York from the 1930s until his death.  His paintings have become icons in America painting but in 1967 Gottlieb suddenly began to work in sculpture.  His maquettes composed of cardboard painted with acrylic and his aluminum and bronze final sculptures represent an extension into the third dimension of many of the concerns that occupied him in his paintings. Docents will share this important body of work.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

November 30



Saturday, November 30, 11 am - 5 pm
Galleries

The Kelsey Museum of Archaeology's collection of Islamic art ranges from the eighth to the nineteenth century and reflects the brilliant diversity of the cultural traditions of Islam. Fragments from the Past: Islamic Art from the Collection of the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology features vessels, architectural fragments, furniture, and other artifacts from Egypt, Syria, Turkey, Iraq, and Iran that reveal the aesthetic attention paid by artisans to the objects of everyday life. These objects demonstrate the interplay of function and form in artisanal traditions, and the designs and patterns revealed on the exquisitely detailed fragments presented are a testament to the many stories that run through the pasts of these peoples and cultures.


This exhibition is part of the UM Collections Collaborations series, co-organized by and presented at UMMA and designed to showcase the renowned and diverse collections at the University of Michigan. The UM Collections Collaborations series is generously supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.



categories: