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Programs and Tours

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March 1



Friday, March 1, 11:10 am - 1 pm
Galleries
$10 one time drop-in fee (cash only), materials included. Pick up materials at the information desk.

 This drop-in gallery class offers an opportunity to be more than a spectator at the Museum. With the guidance of the instructor, learn to observe the works in the UMMA collections; experiment with proportion, perspective, line quality, value, composition, and personal style. No experience necessary; all are welcome!

categories: Artmaking

March 2



Saturday, March 2, 8:30 am - 4 pm
Multipurpose Room
Galleries
Advance registration required: umma.umich.edu/education/workshops.html.

Teachers attending the UMMA workshop for El Anatsui: When I Last Wrote to You about Africa will explore the protean artistic talents reflected in and teaching possibilities of El Anatsui’s work with Joe Fusaro, Senior Education Advisor for Art21. They will enjoy a private gallery talk and a hands-on activity with take-home lesson plans. A light meal and a folder of contextual information will be available to all participants.

El Anatsui: When I Last Wrote to You about Africa is organized by the Museum for African Art, New York, and has been supported, in part, by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Lead support for UMMA’s installation is provided by the University of Michigan Health System, Office of the President, Office of the Provost, Office of the Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, and the Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design; the University of Michigan Credit Union; and the James L. and Vivian A. Curtis Endowment Fund. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan African Studies Center, CEW Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Fund, Department of Afroamerican and African Studies, Department of the History of Art, Institute for the Humanities, Museum Studies Program, and School of Natural Resources and Environment.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program

March 3



Sunday, March 3, 1 pm - 12 am
A. Alfred Taubman Gallery I
This program is free and open to the public, but space is limited. Please register to secure your place by emailing umma-tours@umich.edu.

Joe Fusaro, Senior Education Advisor for Art21, will lead this in-gallery program for adults that invites visitors to look closely at the stunning works in the exhibition and discuss Anatsui in the context of contemporary art. El Anatsui is featured in Season 6 of Art21’s Peabody Award-winning biennial television series, Art in the Twenty-First Century. Included are glimpses into his studio and insight into his use of language and symbols. In the contemplative environment of his studio, El Anatsui oversees assistants from the local community who work with him to create sculptures made from bottle caps. A richness and fluidity of meaning are found in Anatsui’s native language, Ewe (often used in the titles of his artwork), and in the adinkra symbol system he employs in many pieces. Join Joe Fusaro in this exploration of Anatsui’s art and practice.

El Anatsui: When I Last Wrote to You about Africa is organized by the Museum for African Art, New York, and has been supported, in part, by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Lead support for UMMA’s installation is provided by the University of Michigan Health System, Office of the President, Office of the Provost, Office of the Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, and the Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design; the University of Michigan Credit Union; and the James L. and Vivian A. Curtis Endowment Fund. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan African Studies Center, CEW Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Fund, Department of Afroamerican and African Studies, Department of the History of Art, Institute for the Humanities, Museum Studies Program, and School of Natural Resources and Environment.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, March 3, 2 pm - 3 pm

Thangkas are portable religious paintings on cloth featuring colorful images of Buddha and Buddhist deities. Such works served as didactic devices and aided devotees in their religious practice. Docents will guide visitors to an understanding of the rich iconography and the colorful images that make these facinating objects to study. This exhibition features objects from the Walter Norman Koelz Collection of Himalayan Art at the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

March 8



Friday, March 8, 11:10 am - 1 pm
Galleries
$10 one time drop-in fee (cash only), materials included. Pick up materials at the information desk.

This drop-in gallery class offers an opportunity to be more than a spectator at the Museum. With the guidance of the instructor, learn to observe the works in the UMMA collections; experiment with proportion, perspective, line quality, value, composition, and personal style. No experience necessary; all are welcome!

categories: Artmaking





Friday, March 8, 7 pm - 12 am

Filmed over three years in Venice, Nsukka, and the United States, this is a powerful portrait of Africa's most widely acclaimed contemporary artist El Anatsui. Directed by Susan Vogel, Fold Crumple Crush: The Art of El Anatsui (2011, 53 min.) gives an insider's view of the artist's practice, the ingenious steps and thousands of hours of labor that convert used bottle tops into huge, opulent wall hangings. Here Anatsui explains how his artworks have become a marriage of painting and sculpture, objects that speak of African history but also reach for the ethereal—and he talks about his aspirations for artworks he has yet to make.

Behind the charming, easy-going artist we discover a man who remains mysterious even to his dearest friends. The film circles around Anatsui, drawing ever closer to a deep understanding of the man and his surprising bottle top hangings. We see the celebrated artist installing work on the great world stage of the Venice Biennale; we follow him back to the small town of Nsukka as he goes about his daily life, then watch him inside the hive of his studio directing assistants as they stitch together bottle tops into a vast metal hanging. Finally, Anatsui admits us to the privacy of his home where he tells us about his formative years, and reveals a youthful discovery that clouded his life.

Accompanied by Anatsui at Work: Eight Short Films (2011, 26 min.), also directed by Susan Vogel. These elegant, instructive shorts depict Anatsui demonstrating his artistic process and discussing his theories on specific media as he creates one of his most ambitious works in Nsukka and installs it on the façade of the Palazzo Fortuny Museum in Venice.

El Anatsui: When I Last Wrote to You about Africa is organized by the Museum for African Art, New York, and has been supported, in part, by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Lead support for UMMA’s installation is provided by the University of Michigan Health System, Office of the President, Office of the Provost, Office of the Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, and Penny W. Stamps School of Art & Design's Speaker Series; the University of Michigan Credit Union; and the James L. and Vivian A. Curtis Endowment Fund. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan African Studies Center, CEW Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Fund, Department of Afroamerican and African Studies, Department of the History of Art, Institute for the Humanities, Museum Studies Program, and School of Natural Resources & Environment.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Film

March 10

Guided Tour

Sunday, March 10, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent's approach and choice of objects is unique.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, March 10, 2 pm - 3 pm

The major retrospective of internationally renowned artist El Anatsui, presents the largest compilation of his works ever assembled, including massive wall pieces and large-scale floor installations. UMMA docents will place Anatsui in the context of contemporary art and allow visitors to look more closely at the stunning works in the exhibition.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

March 12



Tuesday, March 12, 7 pm - 12 am
Helmut Stern Auditorium

As the United States continues to build a wall between itself and Mexico, Which Way Home shows the personal side of immigration through the eyes of children. Director Rebecca Cammisa tracks the journey of several unaccompanied child migrants as they journey through Mexico en route to the US on a freight train they call “The Beast.” Two short films on undocumented migration precede the main screening. The screening is presented in conjunction with the UM Institute for the Humanities exhibition State of Exception which curates objects from Jason De León’s Undocumented Migration Project, the largest assemblage of migrant artifacts in the country. The exhibition is a collaboration between De León, UM assistant professor of anthropology, artist/photographer Richard Barnes, and IH curator Amanda Krugliak, and runs at the IH Gallery (202 S. Thayer Street) January 24 through March 12, 2013.

Jason De León and Amanda Krugliak will lead a guided tour and Q&A of State of Exception at the Institute for Humanities immediately following the screening.

Presented in collaboration with UMMA and the UM Institute for the Humanities.

This program is part of the UMS on Film series designed to expand understanding of the artists and cultures represented on the UMS season and reveal something of the emotions and ideas behind the creative process. For more information, please visit http://www.ums.org

categories: Film

March 13



Wednesday, March 13, 5:30 pm - 12 am

Taking inspiration from the UMMA exhibition Buddhist Thangkas and Treasures: The Walter Koelz Collection, Museum of Anthropology (on view February 23 through June 9, 2013), which features these colorful and fascinating paintings often used in Buddhist religious practice, Jewel Heart of Ann Arbor invites you to come enjoy a hands-on session of guided meditation, including healing visualization techniques.

We invite you to experience first-hand the living tradition presented in this exhibition with a meditation session. No prior experience with meditation or familiarity with Buddhism is required.

This program is offered by Jewel Heart, the Ann Arbor headquarters of the Tibetan Buddhist organization founded by Gelek Rimpoche. Another session will be offered on Tuesday, May 7 at 5:30 pm. For more information, please visit http://www.jewelheart.org/ or call Jewel Heart at (734) 994-3387.

Jewel Heart, 1129 Oak Valley Drive, Ann Arbor

The exhibition Buddhist Thangkas and Treasures: The Walter Koelz Collection, Museum of Anthropology is part of the UM Collections Collaborations series, co-organized by and presented at UMMA and designed to showcase the renowned and diverse collections at the University of Michigan. The UM Collections Collaborations series is generously supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Special Events

March 14



Thursday, March 14, 5:10 pm - 12 am
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Farnoosh Fathi was born in 1981 in Lafayette, Louisiana, to Iranian parents. Raised in California, she attended Chadwick School and UCLA. She earned an MA from NYU and a PhD in creative writing and literature from the University of Houston. Her poems have appeared in Tin House, Boston Review, High Chair, Fence, and other journals. Her translations of poetry have appeared in Circumference and Jacket2, her interviews with poets can be found in The Brooklyn Rail, and her essay on Emily Dickinson’s influence on contemporary poetry can be found in The Emily Dickinson Journal. The recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship to Brazil and a MacDowell Colony Fellowship, she currently lives and works in Carmel Valley, California.

Anthony Madrid lives in Chicago. His poems have recently appeared or are forthcoming in AGNI Online, Boston Review, Fence, Gulf Coast, Iowa Review, Lana Turner, LIT, Poetry, Washington Square, and WEB CONJUNCTIONS. His first book is called I Am Your Slave Now Do What I Say (Canarium Books, 2012).

The authors will be available to sign books in the auditorium after the reading. As always, books will be available for purchase on site.

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Department of English Program in Creative Writing Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell (’64). For more information, please see http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp

categories: Writers Series





Thursday, March 14, 5:10 pm - 12 am
Historic Theater, Michigan Theater
603 E. Liberty

Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Events in the Penny Stamps series are always free of charge and open to the public.

Lynda Barry has worked as a painter, cartoonist, writer, illustrator, playwright, editor, commentator, and teacher. The creator of the comic strip that was syndicated in alternative weeklies for two decades, Ernie Pook's Comeek, she has also authored eighteen books including One! Hundred! Demons!; The! Greatest! of! Marlys!, Cruddy: An Illustrated Novel; Naked Ladies! Naked Ladies! Naked Ladies! and The Good Times are Killing Me, which was adapted as an off-Broadway play. Her creative writing-how to-graphic novel, What It Is (2008), won the Eisner Award for Best Reality Based Graphic Novel. What It Is and Picture This (2010), explores creation and imagination, where play can be serious, monsters have purpose, and not knowing is an answer unto itself.

Established with the generous support of UM School of Art and Design alumna Penny W. Stamps, the Stamps Speaker Series brings respected emerging and established artists/designers from a broad spectrum of media to the School to conduct a public lecture and engage with students, faculty, and the larger University and Ann Arbor communities. Additional support is provided by our media sponsor, Michigan Radio.

With support from the Institute for Research on Women and Gender, the Institute for the Humanities, and the Chelsea River Gallery.

categories: Special Events





Thursday, March 14, 7 pm - 10 pm

Art, music, atmosphere--UMMA invites you to spend the evening with us at this free community event. Stand before the shimmering fields of color created by West African artist El Anatsui in the career retrospective El Anatsui: When I Last Wrote to You About Africa, take a walk around London with the Queen of England’s guards in Francis Alÿs’s video work Guards, travel to the Himalayas with Buddhist Thangkas and Treasures: The Walter Koelz Collection, Museum of Anthropology, and find out what an architect does with Alice in Wonderland and Andy Warhol’s dessert recipes in Florencia Pita/FP mod. The Ingrid Racine Quartet, featuring local jazz sensation Ingrid Racine – formerly of the post-afrobeat band NOMO -- on trumpet, Detroit guitarist and Wayne State faculty member Chuck Newsome, bassist Jordan Schug, and drummer Rob Avsharian will present jazz interpretations of Afropop classics and original compositions inspired by the Mande tradition of West Africa. Light refreshments and curators chats round out the evening.

UMMA Members receive 25% off in the Museum Store (must show membership card to receive discount).

UMMA After Hours is generously sponsored by Fidelity Investments.

categories: Special Events

March 15

Guided Tour

Friday, March 15, 12:15 pm - 12:45 pm

Designed specifically for the lunch hour, UMMA staff and student docents will offer thirty minutes of conversation about art in the UMMA galleries around fresh, entertaining, and seasonal themes such as, love, heroes, food, and more. Meet at the Information Desk.
 

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours





Friday, March 15, 7 pm - 12 am
Helmut Stern Auditorium

One MFA student of fiction and one of poetry, each introduced by a peer, will read from their work. The Mark Webster Reading Series presents emerging writers in a warm and relaxed setting. We encourage you to bring your friends—a Webster reading makes for an enjoyable and enlightening Friday evening.

categories: Writers Series

March 16



Saturday, March 16, 11:15 am - 11:45 am

Children ages four to seven are invited to hear a story in the galleries. Student docents and UMMA staff will bring art to life as they read stories related to the art on display and invite responses from our youngest patrons. Each story is followed by a short art activity. Parents must accompany children. Siblings are welcome to join the group. Meet at the Information Desk.

categories: Family, Gallery Talks and Tours

March 17

Guided Tour

Sunday, March 17, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent's approach and choice of objects is unique. The subject for today is Great 'Scapes Around the World.

Landscapes, riverscapes, townscapes, and skyscapes have long provided mental refuge from the mundane world, for artists and viewers alike. Some artists express a yearning for escape, such as the Chinese literati painter placing his imaginary poet in a remote mountain pavilion. Other artists might capture on canvas the fearsome power of a looming storm, or document in photography the evidence of human activity on our changing planet. This docent-led tour encompasses a variety of eras, traditions, and media with information and conversation.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, March 17, 2 pm - 3 pm

Join docents as they explore the exciting installation by Argentina-born, Los Angeles-based architect and designer Florencia Pita. Pita's boldly colored works draw from literary, art, and biological sources; employ cutting-edge architectural fabrication techniques; and cross borders of visual art, architecture, and design.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours





Sunday, March 17, 3 pm - 12 am
This program is free and open to the public, but space is limited. Please register to secure your place by emailing umma-tours@umich.edu.

Exhibition co-curator, Professor of Anthropology and Director of Museum Studies Carla Sinopoli will lead this in-gallery program for adults. In 1932, “Michigan Man” Walter Norman Koelz traveled to northwest India, leading a scientific expedition into Himalayan regions, which included the Westernmost outpost of Tibetan culture. Among the twelve large crates Koelz shipped to Ann Arbor---containing thousands of plant and animal specimens and more than 600 objects, including paintings, textiles, bronzes, jewelry, wooden moulds and stamps, and bone artifacts, preserved today at the Museum of Anthropology---were the paintings and other objects on display in Buddhist Thangkas and Treasures. This informal gallery talk will offer an opportunity to look more closely at the items in the exhibition, placing them in the context of Koelz ambitions to create a collection of Tibetan artifacts for the University, and the journey he undertook to reach that goal. Held in the A. Alfred Taubman Gallery II

The exhibition Buddhist Thangkas and Treasures: The Walter Koelz Collection, Museum of Anthropology is part of the UM Collections Collaborations series, co-organized by and presented at UMMA and designed to showcase the renowned and diverse collections at the University of Michigan. The UM Collections Collaborations series is generously supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Gallery Talks and Tours

March 19



Tuesday, March 19, 5 pm - 7 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Arjia Rinpoche is the former abbot of one of the most famous monasteries in Tibet and a frequent lecturer on Tibetan art. In this lecture in conjunction with the UMMA exhibition Buddhist Thangkas and Treasures: The Walter Koelz Collection, Museum of Anthropology (on view February 23 through June 9, 2013), he will discuss the important role that art plays in the practice of Tibetan Buddhism. The lecture will follow a brief blessing ceremony in the UMMA Apse at 5 pm.

The exhibition Buddhist Thangkas and Treasures: The Walter Koelz Collection, Museum of Anthropology is part of the UM Collections Collaborations series, co-organized by and presented at UMMA and designed to showcase the renowned and diverse collections at the University of Michigan. The UM Collections Collaborations series is generously supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program





Tuesday, March 19, 6:30 pm - 12 am
4th Floor East Conference Room, Rackham Graduate School
915 E Washington St

Ann Arbor, MI 48109

This lecture reviews the transformational changes that have occurred in the representation of indigenous peoples and 'multicultural' communities in North America during the past twenty-five years. These transformations have involved both process-- most importantly power transfers and power-sharing arrangements-- and product-- the forceful presence of minority voices and perspectives in exhibitions.

The result of these transformations has been a hybridization that takes three forms in contemporary museums: new kinds of content in exhibitions, collaborative processes for the development of exhibits and programs, and a deliberate blurring of the disciplinary typology that has structured the modern museum system. Although these three modes of hybridity are interrelated, it is useful to distinguish them as a way to assess the gains and potential losses that have occurred. The subtitle of the lecture invokes the lyrics from the 1960s song, "The Age of Aquarius" in order to point to the parallel millenarian ethos that informs these museological transformations. I argue that we can omit the original question mark because the 'dawning' of the age of hybridity has already occurred in museums. We must now confront the question -- particularly urgent in Canada in light of the radical changes the Conservative government has recently announced for our national museums-- of whether we will succeed in seeing the new day of its unfolding.

Ruth B. Phillips holds a Canada Research Chair in Aboriginal Art and Culture and is Professor of Art History at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. After doctoral research on Mende women’s masks from West Africa, she focused her research and teaching on Native North American art and critical museology. Her most recent book, Museum Pieces: Toward the Indigenization of Canadian Museums (2011), was shortlisted for the Donner Prize in Canadian Public Policy and won the Ottawa Book Award for non-fiction. Other books include Trading Identities: The Souvenir in Native North American Art from the Northeast, 1700-1900 (1998), Native North American Art (with Janet Catherine Berlo, 1998), and Unpacking Culture: Arts and Commodities in Colonial and Postcolonial Worlds (co-edited with Christopher Steiner, 1999). She served as director of the University of British Columbia Museum of Anthropology from 1997-2003 and as president of CIHA, UNESCO’s world association of art historians, from 2004-8. She is a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.

categories:

March 21



Thursday, March 21, 5 pm - 12 am
Helmut Stern Auditorium

UMMA welcomes Professor Mabel O. Wilson of Columbia University to discuss her 2012 book Negro Building: Black Americans in the World of Fairs and Museums. Professor Wilson will be joined for this event by UM Professors Kevin K. Gaines (History and Department of Afroamerican and African Studies) and Magdalena J. Zaborowska (American Culture and DAAS).

Negro Building examines the history of exhibitions about black Americans, from the Civil War to the Civil Rights Movement, focusing on the increasing curatorial participation of African Americans themselves and the formative role of this participation in the development of models of identity and of a black American public sphere.

Mabel O. Wilson directs the Program for Advanced Architectural Research at Columbia’s Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation. Like the book that she will be discussing for this event, she navigates in her scholarly work and her studio practice between the fields of architecture, art, and cultural history. Her scholarly essays have appeared in numerous journals and books on critical geography, memory studies, art and architecture. Her studio work has been exhibited at the Wexner Center for the Arts, the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum’s Triennial, the Storefront for Art and Architecture, and SF Cameraworks.

Dr. Wilson’s interlocutors for this event bring a wealth of knowledge about the central roles played by African Americans in twentieth-century American cultural history and the formation of notions of American identity. Dr. Kevin G. Gaines is the Robert Hayden Collegiate Professor of History and Afroamerican and African Studies at the University of Michigan. His most recent book is American Africans in Ghana: Black Expatriates in the Civil Rights Era (2006). Dr. Magdalena J. Zaborowska is a Professor in American Culture and the Department of Afroamerican and African Studies. Her most recent book is James Baldwin’s Turkish Decade: Erotics of Exile (2009).

This project is made possible in part by the LSA Understanding Race Theme Semester. For more information about the Theme Semester, please visit http://understandingraceproject.org/

categories: Special Events





Thursday, March 21, 5:10 pm - 12 am
Historic Theater, Michigan Theater
603 E. Liberty

Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Events in the Penny Stamps series are always free of charge and open to the public.

Filmmaker Ken Burns has directed and produced some of the most acclaimed historical documentaries ever made, including The Civil War; Baseball; Jazz, Statue of Liberty; Huey Long; Lewis and Clark: The Journey of the Corps of Discovery; Frank Lloyd Wright; Mark Twain; Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson; The War; The National Parks: America’s Best Idea; and, most recently, The Dust Bowl. His films have been honored with dozens of major awards, including thirteen Emmy Awards, two Grammy Awards and two Oscar nominations; and a 2008 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Established with the generous support of UM School of Art and Design alumna Penny W. Stamps, the Stamps Speaker Series brings respected emerging and established artists/designers from a broad spectrum of media to the School to conduct a public lecture and engage with students, faculty, and the larger University and Ann Arbor communities. Additional support is provided by our media sponsor, Michigan Radio.

With support from by the Department of Screen Arts & Cultures, and the Ann Arbor Film Festival.

categories: Special Events

March 23



Saturday, March 23, 7 pm - 12 am
Helmut Stern Auditorium
Admission is free, and there will be a discussion afterwards about the impact of the 1967 events on the subsequent history of Detroit.

Spirit of Detroit, a new play by Mercilee M. Jenkins tells the story of two people, Anthony, a black man, and Lucy, a white woman, who return to Detroit after a long absence to find a very different city. They grew up on the east side in different worlds only three blocks from each other, together survived the events of July 1967—alternately described as a riot and a rebellion—and now meet again forty years later. As they revisit their past through Anthony’s paintings, they come to a new understanding of their relationship to each other and the future of the city. Two actors play all the characters in Spirit, demonstrating our connections to each other, even in our moments of deepest conflict. The Spirit of Detroit reminds us why we stayed, why we left, why we came back and why we’re here now—the opportunity to create a twenty-first century Detroit. The play, which has had staged readings at Matrix Theatre in Detroit, will be directed by Kate Mendeloff of the UM Residential College. It is a featured program University of Michigan’s LSA Winter 2013 Theme Semester Understanding Race. http://understandingraceproject.org/

categories: Performing Arts

March 24



Sunday, March 24, 12 pm - 12 am
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Join the 51st Ann Arbor Film Festival for this exciting program of contemporary artist-made music videos co-curated and presented by Dan Hirsch, Curator at the Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University.

Cosponsored by the University of Michigan Museum of Art.

categories: Film



Guided Tour

Sunday, March 24, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent's approach and choice of objects is unique.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, March 24, 2 pm - 3 pm

The major retrospective of internationally renowned artist El Anatsui, presents the largest compilation of his works ever assembled, including massive wall pieces and large-scale floor installations. UMMA docents will place Anatsui in the context of contemporary art and allow visitors to look more closely at the stunning works in the exhibition.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours





Sunday, March 24, 7 pm - 12 am
Admission is free, and there will be a discussion afterwards about the impact of the 1967 events on the subsequent history of Detroit.

Spirit of Detroit, a new play by Mercilee M. Jenkins tells the story of two people, Anthony, a black man, and Lucy, a white woman, who return to Detroit after a long absence to find a very different city. They grew up on the east side in different worlds only three blocks from each other, together survived the events of July 1967—alternately described as a riot and a rebellion—and now meet again forty years later. As they revisit their past through Anthony’s paintings, they come to a new understanding of their relationship to each other and the future of the city. Two actors play all the characters in Spirit, demonstrating our connections to each other, even in our moments of deepest conflict. The Spirit of Detroit reminds us why we stayed, why we left, why we came back and why we’re here now—the opportunity to create a twenty-first century Detroit.

The play, which has had staged readings at Matrix Theatre in Detroit, will be directed by Kate Mendeloff of the UM Residential College. It is a featured program University of Michigan’s LSA Winter 2013 Theme Semester Understanding Race. http://understandingraceproject.org/

categories: Performing Arts, Special Events

March 26



Tuesday, March 26, 5:30 pm - 12 am
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Cuban artist María Magdalena Campos-Pons visits UMMA to discuss her wide-ranging work in visual and performance art over the past three decades. Dealing extensively with the legacy of the African diaspora across the Atlantic, Campos-Pons’s work inquires about the continuities of family and traditions as they persist and sustain despite the disruptions of the past, while also exploring how they can define and constrain definitions of selfhood. Her art has been exhibited around the world, with notable solo shows at the Museum of Modern Art and the Venice Biennale 2001 and a large retrospective at the Indianapolis Museum of Art in 2007, the same year in which she was also the recipient of the Rappaport Prize. She is co-founder of GASP, a gallery and collaborative artists’ space in Boston, and teaches at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in the same city.

Joining Campos-Pons to discuss her work will be Larry La Fountain-Stokes, UM Associate Professor of American Culture, Romance Languages, and Women’s Studies. Dr. La Fountain-Stokes is a scholar of contemporary avant-garde performance cultures across Latin America and is most recently the author of Queer Ricans: Cultures and Sexualities in the Diaspora (2009).

This project is made possible in part by the LSA Understanding Race Theme Semester and the Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs. For more information about the Theme Semester, please visit http://understandingraceproject.org/

categories: Special Events

March 28



Thursday, March 28, 5:10 pm - 12 am
Historic Theater, Michigan Theater
603 E. Liberty

Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Events in the Penny Stamps series are always free of charge and open to the public.

Alina Troyano, aka Carmelita Tropicana, straddles the world of performance art and theatre using irreverent humor and fantasy to rewrite history from the viewpoints of woman, man, child, and assorted animals and insects. As a bicultural artist, she uses both spoken language and a visual language that integrates live performance with mutimedia, and costumes of fruit, faux fur, camouflage, and Saran wrap to provide social commentary.

Established with the generous support of UM School of Art and Design alumna Penny W. Stamps, the Stamps Speaker Series brings respected emerging and established artists/designers from a broad spectrum of media to the School to conduct a public lecture and engage with students, faculty, and the larger University and Ann Arbor communities.

Additional support is provided by our media sponsor, Michigan Radio. With support from the Program in Latina/o Studies, Program in American Culture, Department of Theatre and Drama, and the Office of the Provost UM Dearborn.

categories: Special Events

March 29



Friday, March 29, 7 pm - 12 am
Apse

Taking inspiration from the creative process of Florencia Pita, this year’s SMTD@UMMA concert series closes with an evening of new works ranging from live electronics to experimental theater, all generated from an initiating cell or idea. UM Associate Professor of Music Adam Unsworth performs Kevin Ernste’s Nisi for horn and live electronics. Local soprano Jennifer Goltz premieres a new piece by University of Indianapolis Professor (and UM alumnus) John Berners, in which a single line of text is sung, fragmented, breathed, spoken, explored, and shouted. Local ensemble Latitude 49, made up of UM graduate students, perform new compositions influenced in part by minimalism. Multimedia artist Carlos Garcia joins Goltz to premiere a new work for voices and electronics that forms itself in real time.

The SMTD@UMMA performance series is made possible in part by the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund.

Lead support for this exhibition is provided by the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, Laura Lynch and Hugh McPherson, and the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts. Additional generous support is provided by Taubman College of Architecture + Urban Planning.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Special Events

March 30



Saturday, March 30, 9 am - 1 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Held in conjunction with the UMMA exhibition Buddhist Thangkas and Treasures: The Walter Koelz Collection, Museum of Anthropology, this one-day gathering brings together specialists on Tibetan Buddhist art and material culture to explore the history of collecting of Tibetan art, including the Koelz Collection featured in the exhibition, and the role and significance of paintings and other objects in Tibetan Buddhism. Speakers include Clare Harris (University of Oxford), Robert Linrothe (Northwestern University), and Donald S. Lopez, Jr. and Carla M. Sinopoli (University of Michigan).

Participants are invited to join co-curators Carla Sinopoli and Donald Lopez for a tour of the exhibition at 2:30 pm.

The exhibition Buddhist Thangkas and Treasures: The Walter Koelz Collection, Museum of Anthropology is part of the UM Collections Collaborations series, co-organized by and presented at UMMA and designed to showcase the renowned and diverse collections at the University of Michigan. The UM Collections Collaborations series is generously supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Gallery Talks and Tours, Special Events





Saturday, March 30, 4 pm - 12 am
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Don’t miss this conversation with internationally recognized artist, curator, and critic Michelle Grabner at the University of Michigan Museum of Art (UMMA). Grabner has been named as one of three curators for the 2014 Whitney Biennale and the Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland is organizing a traveling survey exhibition of her artwork that will open in the fall of 2013.

Michelle Grabner is Professor and Chair of Painting and Drawing at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and senior critic at Yale University, Department of Painting and Printmaking. She is a corresponding editor for the quarterly art journal X-TRA, and a regular contributor to Artforum, Art-Agenda, and other publications. Grabner has exhibited nationally and internationally including Musée d´art Grand-Duc Jean, Luxembourg; Tate St. Ives, UK; Daimler Contemporary, Berlin; Rocket, London; Feigen, Inc., New York; and The Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; among others.

Grabner, and her husband, Brad Killam, cofounded and run two art spaces, The Suburban, in Oak Park, IL and the Poor Farm in Northeastern Wisconsin, hosting projects by numerous major and emerging artists, including Ceal Floyer, Luc Tuymans, Katharina Grosse, Katrin Sigurdardottir, and Gretchen Bender.

Michelle Grabner will be in dialogue with artist Lily Cox-Richard (Michigan Society of Fellows and Stamps School of Art & Design Assistant Professor). Cox-Richard created a site-specific project at The Poor Farm in 2011 and will be a visiting artist at the Institute for Humanities in 2014.

This program is presented by the Creative Practice Workgroup, a Rackham Interdisciplinary Workshop between graduate students at the Penny Stamps School of Art & Design and the School of Music, Theater and Dance, with support from the Institute for Humanities and the University of Michigan Museum of Art (UMMA).

categories: Artists and Curators, Special Events

March 31

Guided Tour

Sunday, March 31, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent's approach and choice of objects is unique.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, March 31, 2 pm - 3 pm

Thangkas are portable religious paintings on cloth featuring colorful images of Buddha and Buddhist deities. Such works served as didactic devices and aided devotees in their religious practice. Docents will guide visitors to an understanding of the rich iconography and the colorful images that make these facinating objects to study. This exhibition features objects from the Walter Norman Koelz Collection of Himalayan Art at the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours