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Programs and Tours

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February 1

Ann Arbor Art Center Workshops at UMMA

Friday, February 1, 11:10 am - 1 pm
Galleries
$10 one-time drop-in fee (cash only), materials included

This drop-in gallery class offers an opportunity to be more than a spectator at the Museum. With the guidance of the instructor, learn to observe the works in the UMMA collections; experiment with proportion, perspective, line quality, value, composition, and personal style. No experience necessary; all are welcome!

categories: Artmaking



Writers Series

Friday, February 1, 7 pm - 12 am
Helmut Stern Auditorium

One MFA student of fiction and one of poetry, each introduced by a peer, will read from their work. The Mark Webster Reading Series presents emerging writers in a warm and relaxed setting. We encourage you to bring your friends—a Webster reading makes for an enjoyable and enlightening Friday evening.

categories: Writers Series

February 2

Special Event

Saturday, February 2, 2 pm - 12 am
Hill Auditorium, Hill Auditorium

Join UMS and UMMA in celebrating 100 years of Ann Arbor's most beloved concert venue: Hill Auditorium. As part of a daylong event, UMS premieres its new original documentary celebrating this iconic building. The documentary combines archival material and original interviews to explore Hill's rich history and incredible acoustics, and the vital role Hill Auditorium plays in the cultural vibrancy of our region.

Free and open to the public; no ticket required.

This program is presented in collaboration with the UM Museum of Art and funded in part by the Michigan Humanities Council.

categories: Special Events

February 3

Guided Tour

Sunday, February 3, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA's award-winning docents will guide visitors to experience art through active looking at selected highlights of the collections. These general tours provide a good introduction to the collection and to strategies for looking at art through lively and engaging conversation.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, February 3, 2 pm - 3 pm

African Art and the Shape of Time explores how African art gives material form to diverse concepts of temporality, history, and memory. It complicates conventional views of African art by considering diverse modes for reckoning time and its philosophical, social, and religious significance. Docents will discuss the five themes that explore the multiplicity of time in Africa: The Beginning of Things, Embodied Time, Moving Through Time, Global Time, and NOW. 

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Special Event

Sunday, February 3, 3 pm - 12 am
Galleries

Join Institute for the Humanities graduate student fellow A. Sheree Brown in a conversation focusing on the visual culture resources UMMA created for the LSA Theme Semester, Understanding Race. Twenty-two works of art found in the galleries, display cases, and study rooms have been selected to illuminate the complexity of conceptions and representations of race within several cultures. Even if you are familiar with the objects in question, you will appreciate the fresh approach to this material. Brown will explore these objects and engage visitors in conversation about their genesis and interpretation. Understanding Race UMMA Teaching and Learning materials were created by Summer 2012 UM Arts of Citizenship fellow and history/women’s studies PhD.student Ángela Pérez-Villa, and will also be used by faculty and students in the course of the theme semester.

Reservations required at umma-tours@umich.edu.

For more information about the Understanding Race visual resources, please visit the Education area of the UMMA website at www.umma.umich.edu. More information about the theme semester and related activities are available at http://understandingraceproject.org/.

categories: Special Events

February 5

El Anatsui: When I Last Wrote to You about Africa

Tuesday, February 5, 4 pm - 7 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium
Galleries

This roundtable event, offered by UMMA in collaboration with the Africa workshop series of the Department of Afroamerican and African Studies (DAAS), brings together an exciting collection of scholars for a lively discussion of the myths and misconceptions that abound regarding the category “African art.” Coinciding with the arrival at UMMA of a major retrospective exhibition of Nigerian artist El Anatsui, this panel discussion will address how perceptions and misconceptions about art from Africa relate to the work and reception of contemporary African artists and their interaction with the global art world. UMMA is proud to present the following panelists: UM Professor David Doris (History of Art and DAAS), the author of Vigilant Things: On Thieves, Yoruba Anti-aesthetics, and the Strange Fates of Ordinary Objects in Nigeria; Nii Quarcoopome, Detroit Institute of Arts Curator of African Art and head of the Department of Africa, Oceania, and the Indigenous Americas; and University of Toronto Professor of Art History Elizabeth Harney, the author of numerous books on contemporary art from Africa, including In Senghor's Shadow: Art, Politics, and the Avant-Garde in Senegal, 1960–1995.

El Anatsui: When I Last Wrote to You about Africa is organized by the Museum for African Art, New York, and has been supported, in part, by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Lead support for UMMA’s installation is provided by the University of Michigan Health System, Office of the President, Office of the Provost, Office of the Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, and School of Art & Design's Penny Stamps Speaker Series; the University of Michigan Credit Union; and the James L. and Vivian A. Curtis Endowment Fund. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan African Studies Center, CEW Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Fund, Department of Afroamerican and African Studies, Department of the History of Art, Institute for the Humanities, Museum Studies Program, and School of Natural Resources & Environment.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Special Events

February 6



Wednesday, February 6, 5 pm - 12 am

The University of Michigan Department of the History of Art presents: Prismatic Scatterings: Global Modernists in Post-War Europe. Elizabeth Harney, Associate Professor, University of Toronto. This project focuses on the histories of visual practice amongst artists hailing from colonies in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean, and African Americans working in post-war Europe. It will challenge standard histories of this historical moment by identifying the ‘connective tissues’ of modernity that supported diverse communities of practice. Standard histories of the postwar moment omit the vibrant intellectual networks of global artists working in Europe. Like those of an earlier inter-war generation, these artists--united in their shared condition of exile and with continued ties to ‘elsewhere’-- networked in salons, studios, art academies, jazz halls and cafés. A number worked alongside colleagues in the Art Informel, Cobra, or Lettrism movements. They developed their practices in the shadow of the Algerian revolution, within the psychic and political struggles of decolonization and ‘thirdworldism,’ and against the backdrop of post-war socio-cultural revolutions and Cold War politics.

categories: Special Events

February 7

Penny W. Stamps Speaker Series

Thursday, February 7, 5:10 pm - 12 am
Historic Theater, Michigan Theater
603 E. Liberty

Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Events in the Penny Stamps series are always free of charge and open to the public.

Don’t miss this conversation with internationally renowned artist El Anatsui offered in conjunction with UMMA’s exhibition of El Anatsui: When I Last Wrote You about Africa. The exhibition presents work from throughout the artist’s life in diverse media that invite reflection on memory and history as well as the countless everyday objects we so readily use up and discard. Born in Ghana and residing in Nigeria, where he was a professor at the University of Nigeria, Nsukka, for thirty-six years before retiring in 2011, El Anatsui’s work has engaged the local and the international with global impact. The power of his forms and their equally strong relationship to conceptual ideas connect them to traditions of African art, yet his transformations of material and experience—whether somber or joyful—are dynamic and contemporary and have gained him an international reputation. El Anatsui will be interviewed by longtime colleague and University of Toronto Professor Elizabeth Harney.

Dr. Harney has written and published widely about global modernisms, contemporary art practice in Africa and its diasporas, post-colonial theory, and the politics of exhibition. Harney also served as the first curator of contemporary art at the National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution.




This program is organized by UMMA with the UM Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design as part of the Penny W. Stamps Speaker series with the assistance of the Institute for the Humanities, and the generous supporter of campus partners and donors listed below.

El Anatsui: When I Last Wrote to You about Africa is organized by the Museum for African Art, New York, and has been supported, in part, by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Lead support for UMMA’s installation is provided by the University of Michigan Health System, Office of the President, Office of the Provost, Office of the Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, and School of Art & Design's Penny Stamps Speaker Series; the University of Michigan Credit Union; and the James L. and Vivian A. Curtis Endowment Fund. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan African Studies Center, CEW Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Fund, Department of Afroamerican and African Studies, Department of the History of Art, Institute for the Humanities, Museum Studies Program, and School of Natural Resources & Environment.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Special Events





Thursday, February 7, 5:10 pm - 12 am
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Elizabeth McCracken, a former public librarian, is the author of four books: An Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination, The Giant’s House (a finalist for the National Book Award), Niagara Falls All Over Again (winner of the L. L. Winship/PEN New England award), and the short story collection Here’s Your Hat What’s Your Hurry. She is frequently a faculty member at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and has received grants and awards from numerous organizations, including the National Endowment for the Arts, the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the Guggenheim Foundation.

The author will be available to sign books after the lecture. As always, books will be available for purchase on site.

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Department of English Program in Creative Writing Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell (’64). For more information, please see http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp

categories: Writers Series

February 8



Friday, February 8, 11:10 am - 1 pm
Galleries
$10 one-time drop-in fee (cash only), materials included

This drop-in gallery class offers an opportunity to be more than a spectator at the Museum. With the guidance of the instructor, learn to observe the works in the UMMA collections; experiment with proportion, perspective, line quality, value, composition, and personal style. No experience necessary; all are welcome!

categories: Artmaking



Guided Tour

Friday, February 8, 12:15 pm - 12:45 pm

Designed specifically for the lunch hour, UMMA staff and student docents will offer thirty minutes of conversation about art in the UMMA galleries around fresh, entertaining, and seasonal themes such as, love, heroes, food, and more. Meet at the Information Desk.
 

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

February 9



Saturday, February 9, 11:15 am - 11:45 am

Children ages four to seven are invited to hear a story in the galleries. Student docents and UMMA staff will bring art to life as they read stories related to the art on display and invite responses from our youngest patrons. Each story is followed by a short art activity. Parents must accompany children. Siblings are welcome to join the group. Meet at the Information Desk.

categories: Family, Gallery Talks and Tours





Saturday, February 9, 1 pm - 4 pm
Multipurpose Room
$28 UMMA and AAAC members and UM students/$35 non-members; lab fee $15, materials included. Advance registration required by Wednesday, February 6. Register online at annarborartcenter.org.

Students will explore a different artist, artifact or art movement from the permanent collection. Guided by an Ann Arbor Art Center Instructor, students will learn proportion, perspective, line quality, value, and composition. All levels welcome.

categories: Artmaking

February 10

Guided Tour

Sunday, February 10, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA's award-winning docents will guide visitors to experience art through active looking at selected highlights of the collections. These general tours provide a good introduction to the collection and to strategies for looking at art through lively and engaging conversation.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, February 10, 2 pm - 3 pm

The major retrospective of internationally renowned artist El Anatsui, presents the largest compilation of his works ever assembled, including massive wall pieces and large-scale floor installations. UMMA docents will place Anatsui in the context of contemporary art and allow visitors to look more closely at the stunning works in the exhibition.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

February 14



Thursday, February 14, 5:10 pm - 12 am
Historic Theater, Michigan Theater
603 E. Liberty

Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Events in the Penny Stamps series are always free of charge and open to the public.

Harald Falckenberg is one of the world's most admired contemporary art collectors. Reknown for his ability to stay ahead of the art market, he was among the first collectors to acquire works by major figures like Martin Kippenberger, Richard Prince and Jonathan Meese. His collection comprises over 2000 works, shown in a 65,000 sq. ft. former factory building in Hamburg. ARTnews chose Falckenberg as one of the world´s top 200 collectors. He has received the Art Cologne Prize and the Montblanc de la Culture Patronage Award, published numerous books on art and teaches art theory at Hamburg's Academy of Fine Arts.

With support from the University of Michigan Museum of Art, the Byrd Hoffman Watermill Foundation, and the Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts.

Established with the generous support of UM School of Art and Design alumna Penny W. Stamps, the Stamps Speaker Series brings respected emerging and established artists/designers from a broad spectrum of media to the School to conduct a public lecture and engage with students, faculty, and the larger University and Ann Arbor communities. Additional support is provided by our media sponsor, Michigan Radio.

categories: Special Events





Thursday, February 14, 5:10 pm - 12 am
Helmut Stern Auditorium

John Glenday’s first collection, The Apple Ghost, won a Scottish Arts Council Book Award and his second, Undark, was a Poetry Book Society Recommendation. His most recent collection, Grain (Picador, 2009) was also a Poetry Book Society Recommendation and was shortlisted for both the Ted Hughes Award and the Griffin International Poetry Prize. He was a judge for the 2011 UK National Poetry Competition. In 1990/91 he was appointed Scottish/Canadian Exchange Fellow, based at the University of Alberta.

The author will be available to sign books after the lecture. As always, books will be available for purchase on site.

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Department of English Program in Creative Writing Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell (’64). For more information, please see http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp

categories: Writers Series

February 15



Friday, February 15, 11:10 am - 1 pm
Galleries
$10 one-time drop-in fee (cash only), materials included

This drop-in gallery class offers an opportunity to be more than a spectator at the Museum. With the guidance of the instructor, learn to observe the works in the UMMA collections; experiment with proportion, perspective, line quality, value, composition, and personal style. No experience necessary; all are welcome!

categories: Artmaking





Friday, February 15, 12 pm - 1 pm
Multipurpose Room

Tyree Guyton’s Heidelberg Project, an outdoor art installation covering several city blocks in the heart of Detroit, has evoked strong reaction from local populations in the 25 years it has stood at the heart of one of the most beleaguered neighborhoods in the city. Envisioned by the artist as a means of engaging local children in positive alternatives to prevailing economic and social conditions, the project has nonetheless found strong opposition within its immediate neighborhood, among Detroit’s powerful church community, and in the corridors of the Detroit City Council and the offices of two powerful city mayors. Over the years the project has been variously celebrated and vilified, often within the same communities.

This presentation examines the relationship of Tyree Guyton and the Heidelberg Project with the multiplicity of communities within which the project exists and points to a unique model of community engagement that has long anticipated much of the current dialogue about the role of the museum in society.

categories: Special Events





Friday, February 15, 7 pm - 12 am

UM Chamber Choir (Jerry Blackstone, conductor), joined by SMTD faculty Jeffrey Lyman and Stanford Olsen, present selections from Irving Fine’s Alice in Wonderland and works by Claudio Monteverdi, Stephen Frost, and visiting composer Lera Auerbach. Audiences are invited to browse the Florencia Pita/FP Mod exhibition to see another Alice by LA-based, Argentinian-born architect and designer Florencia Pita.

The SMTD@UMMA performance series is made possible in part by the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund.

Lead support for the exhibition Florencia Pita/FP Mod is provided by the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, Laura Lynch and Hugh McPherson, and the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts. Additional generous support is provided by Taubman College of Architecture + Urban Planning.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Performing Arts





Friday, February 15, 7 pm - 12 am
Helmut Stern Auditorium

One MFA student of fiction and one of poetry, each introduced by a peer, will read from their work. The Mark Webster Reading Series presents emerging writers in a warm and relaxed setting. We encourage you to bring your friends—a Webster reading makes for an enjoyable and enlightening Friday evening.

categories: Writers Series

February 16



Saturday, February 16, 1 pm - 4 pm
Multipurpose Room
$28 UMMA and AAAC members and UM students/$35 non-members; lab fee $15, materials included. Advance registration required by Wednesday, February 13. Register online at annarborartcenter.org.

Guided by Ann Arbor Art Center instructor Lea Bult, students will view, study, and discuss UMMA’s exhibition Florencia Pita/FP mod. Then they will create a collaged work, combining principles of visual art, architecture, and design. All levels welcome.

categories: Artmaking, Exhibitions Related Program

February 17

Guided Tour

Sunday, February 17, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA's award-winning docents will guide visitors to experience art through active looking at selected highlights of the collections. These general tours provide a good introduction to the collection and to strategies for looking at art through lively and engaging conversation.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, February 17, 2 pm - 3 pm

Join docents as they explore the exciting installation by Argentina-born, Los Angeles-based architect and designer Florencia Pita. Pita's boldly colored works draw from literary, art, and biological sources, employ cutting-edge arcitectural fabrication techniques; and cross borders of visual art, architecture and design. 

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

February 18



Monday, February 18, 5:10 pm - 12 am
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Sivamohan Sumathy holds a doctorate from Washington State University. A senior lecturer in English at the University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka, she has published and presented on postcolonial literature and theory, women’s movements in Sri Lanka, and performing arts (theatre and film). She is the author of Thin Veils: In the Shadow of the Gun & Wicked Witch Performing Act/ivism (2003), Militants, Militarism and the Crisis of (Tamil) Nationalism (2003), and like myth and mother: a political autobiography in poetry and prose (2008). She has also translated others’ work from Tamil to English. Sumathy has written and directed numerous plays, and in addition to performing throughout Sri Lanka, she has performed widely in international locations including New York, London, Philadelphia, and Melbourne. She works with local Sri Lankan groups in training non-actors, mostly women and working people. She has written numerous scripts for activist projects, and has co-scripted a path-breaking documentary feature on the ethnic conflict, In Search of a Road, which premiered at the Singapore International Film Festival. Her first short film Piralayam (Upheaval) was preselected at the Annual Film Without Frontiers of Barcelona in 2005, and she was awarded the Gratiaen Prize for English Literature for Thin Veils in 2001. A member of the drama panel of the Arts Council of Sri Lanka, she also belongs to its performing arts society. Her first feature film, Here and Now (in progress), has received an honorable mention grant from the US-based Global Film Initiative. Most recently, Sumathy Sivamohan won the prestigious Premchand Fellowship (2011) from the National Academy of Letters in India.

YaliniDream conjures spirit through her unique blend of poetry, theater, song, and dance— reshaping reality and seeking peace through justice in the lands of earth, psyche, soul, and dream. One of the South Asian diaspora’s most prominent performance poets, YaliniDream has toured nationally at hundreds of spaces throughout the US, as well as Europe and South Asia. Her work has been performed at theater venues such as New York's Lincoln Center and New York Live Arts (formerly Dance Theater Workshop), Manchester’s Contact Theater, Houston’s Diverse Works, Chicago’s Vittum Theater, Austin’s Hyde Park Theater; poetry venues such as NYC’s Nuyorican Poet’s Cafe, Minneapolis’s The Loft, London’s Royal Vauxhall Tavern; and universities such as Yale, University of Manchester (UK), Loyola College (India), and University of Peradeniya Sri Lanka). Her work has been featured in print in the The Indian Express, online in the Huffington Post, and on air on the Brian Lehrer Show. YaliniDream was a 2006 Mid-Atlantic Artists in Community Fellow at the Asian Arts Initiative, a panelist for the Leeway Foundation's 2007 Transformation Awards, a 2008 Urban Arts Initiative Fellow, and a 2010 recipient of the Jerome Foundation's Travel and Study Award in Literature. As a movement artist, YaliniDream applies a hybrid aesthetic drawing upon vocabulary from ballet, modern, jazz, South Asian folk, and classical and contemporary traditions, as well as US urban forms such as hip hop and house. She has facilitated workshops for war-affected communities in Sri Lankan refugee camps in Tamil Nadu, India, as well as war-affected communities in Mannar, Vavuniya, and Batticaloa, Sri Lanka. In addition, she has worked with survivors of violence from multiple communities including Cambodian-American and communities of African descent in the US. She holds a BA in Plan II Honors and another in theater with a concentration in acting and directing from the University of Texas, Austin. YaliniDream is also a trained aerial dancer in corde lisse who loves to fly—challenging notions of the seemingly impossible.

This program is cosponsored by the Center for World Performance Studies.

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Department of English Program in Creative Writing Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell (’64). For more information, please see http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp

categories: Writers Series

February 19



Tuesday, February 19, 7 pm - 12 am
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Filmed over three years in Venice, Nsukka, and the United States, this is a powerful portrait of Africa's most widely acclaimed contemporary artist El Anatsui. Directed by Susan Vogel, Fold Crumple Crush: The Art of El Anatsui gives an insider's view of the artist's practice, the ingenious steps and thousands of hours of labor that convert used bottle tops into huge, opulent wall hangings. Here Anatsui explains how his artworks have become a marriage of painting and sculpture, objects that speak of African history but also reach for the ethereal—and he talks about his aspirations for artworks he has yet to make.

Behind the charming, easy-going artist we discover a man who remains mysterious even to his dearest friends. The film circles around Anatsui, drawing ever closer to a deep understanding of the man and his surprising bottle top hangings. We see the celebrated artist installing work on the great world stage of the Venice Biennale; we follow him back to the small town of Nsukka as he goes about his daily life, then watch him inside the hive of his studio directing assistants as they stitch together bottle tops into a vast metal hanging. Finally, Anatsui admits us to the privacy of his home where he tells us about his formative years, and reveals a youthful discovery that clouded his life.

Accompanied by Anatsui at Work: Eight Short Films (2011, 26 min.), also directed by Susan Vogel. These elegant, instructive shorts depict Anatsui demonstrating his artistic process and discussing his theories on specific media as he creates one of his most ambitious works in Nsukka and installs it on the façade of the Palazzo Fortuny Museum in Venice.

El Anatsui: When I Last Wrote to You about Africa is organized by the Museum for African Art, New York, and has been supported, in part, by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. 

Lead support for UMMA’s installation is provided by the University of Michigan Health System, Office of the President, Office of the Provost, Office of the Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, and School of Art & Design's Penny Stamps Speaker Series; the University of Michigan Credit Union; and the James L. and Vivian A. Curtis Endowment Fund. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan African Studies Center, CEW Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Fund, Department of Afroamerican and African Studies, Department of the History of Art, Institute for the Humanities, Museum Studies Program, and School of Natural Resources & Environment.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Film

February 20



Wednesday, February 20, 5:10 pm - 12 am
Helmut Stern Auditorium

The Department of Afroamerican and African Studies proudly presents a reading by poet and 2011 National Book Award winner Nikky Finney.

Nikky Finney was born in South Carolina, within listening distance of the sea. A child of activists, she came of age during the civil rights and Black Arts Movements. At Talladega College, nurtured by Hale Woodruff's Amistad murals, Finney began to understand the powerful synergy between art and history. Finney has authored four books of poetry: Head Off & Split (2011); The World Is Round (2003); Rice (1995); and On Wings Made of Gauze (1985). The Guy Davenport Endowed Professor in the Department of English at the University of Kentucky, Finney also authored Heartwood (1997), edited The Ringing Ear: Black Poets Lean South (2007), and co- founded the Affrilachian Poets. Finney's fourth book of poetry, Head Off & Split was awarded the 2011 National Book Award for poetry.

The author will be available to sign books after the reading. As always, books will be available for purchase on site.

Finney’s visit is made possible due to the generous support of the following cosponsors: The Department of English, The MFA Program in Creative Writing, The College of Literature, Science and the Arts, The Residential College of Literature, Science and the Arts, The Institute for the Humanities, The Institute for Research on Women and Gender (IRWG), The Department of Women’s Studies, The Department of American Culture, The Rackham Dean’s Strategic Fund, the Center for World Performance Studies and The Understanding Race Theme Semester.

categories: Writers Series

February 21



Thursday, February 21, 5:10 pm - 12 am
Historic Theater, Michigan Theater
603 E. Liberty

Ann Arbor, MI 48104

Renowned politial and performance artist, Tania Bruguera examines how art can be applied to everyday political life, creating a public forum to debate ideas. Her terms “arte de conducta” (conduct/behavior art) and “arte útil” (useful art) define her practice. In 2010, Bruguera launched Immigrant Movement International, a five-year project on the immigrant as a unique, new global citizen in a postnational world, with artists merging art into society’s social, political, and scientific issues. Bruguera’s work has been presented internationally at Documenta 11, at the Tate Modern, London; Künsthalle Wien, Vienna; Centre Pompidou, Paris; and the New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York.

With support from the Understanding Race theme semester and the Institute for the Humanities.

Established with the generous support of UM School of Art and Design alumna Penny W. Stamps, the Stamps Speaker Series brings respected emerging and established artists/designers from a broad spectrum of media to the School to conduct a public lecture and engage with students, faculty, and the larger University and Ann Arbor communities. Additional support is provided by our media sponsor, Michigan Radio.

categories: Special Events





Thursday, February 21, 6:30 pm - 12 am
4th Floor East Conference Room, Rackham Graduate School
915 E Washington St

Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Juanita Moore, President and CEO of the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History Brief description of the presentation: This presentation will examine how the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History has moved forward in recent years and the challenges now faced in remaining financially viable and maximizing its resources to have greater and sustained community impact.

categories: Special Events





Thursday, February 21, 8 pm - 12 am
Hill Auditorium, Hill Auditorium
Tickets available through the Michigan Union Ticket Office
530 South State St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109
763-TKTS (763-8587) or www.MutoTix.com
Adult $15; student/senior $10; and children under 12 $5

For more information about the concert and artist residency and how to get tickets, please visit www.ii.umich.edu/cwps or contact the UM Center for World Performance Studies.


Don’t miss this one-of-a-kind evening of performance featuring music, dance, and rhythms from West Africa and around the globe. Dobet Gnahoré, the Ivory Coast vocalist and dancer who has garnered a reputation as one of the most vibrant performers in world music, is joined by bassist and vocalist Manou Gallo, from the Ivory Coast, who gained acclamation as the bassist for Zap Mama, whose own music draws on rhythms of West Africa as well as funk and R and B, and Kareyce Fotso, a young Cameroonian singer whose music is an intriguing combination of Afro-pop, Blues, and traditional African music.

This concert is a UM Center for World Performance Studies Signature Event and is presented in conjunction with the exhibition El Anatsui: When I Last Wrote to You about Africa on view at the University of Michigan Museum of Art February 2 through May 5, 2013.

El Anatsui: When I Last Wrote to You about Africa is organized by the Museum for African Art, New York, and has been supported, in part, by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Lead support for UMMA’s installation is provided by the University of Michigan Health System, Office of the President, Office of the Provost, Office of the Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, and School of Art & Design's Penny Stamps Speaker Series; the University of Michigan Credit Union; and the James L. and Vivian A. Curtis Endowment Fund. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan African Studies Center, CEW Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Fund, Department of Afroamerican and African Studies, Department of the History of Art, Institute for the Humanities, Museum Studies Program, and School of Natural Resources & Environment.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Special Events

February 22



Friday, February 22, 11:10 am - 1 pm
Galleries
$10 one-time drop-in fee (cash only), materials included

This drop-in gallery class offers an opportunity to be more than a spectator at the Museum. With the guidance of the instructor, learn to observe the works in the UMMA collections; experiment with proportion, perspective, line quality, value, composition, and personal style. No experience necessary; all are welcome!

categories: Artmaking





Friday, February 22, 7 pm - 12 am

One MFA student of fiction and one of poetry, each introduced by a peer, will read from their work. The Mark Webster Reading Series presents emerging writers in a warm and relaxed setting. We encourage you to bring your friends—a Webster reading makes for an enjoyable and enlightening Friday evening.

categories: Writers Series

February 23



Saturday, February 23, 1 pm - 4 pm
Multipurpose Room
$28 UMMA and AAAC members and UM students/$35 non-members; lab fee $15, materials included. Advance registration required by Wednesday, February 20. Register online at annarborartcenter.org.

Guided by an Ann Arbor Art Center instructor, families will learn how to talk about what they see and how to create art themselves. In this workshop, parents and children will explore an artist, artifact, or art movement from the permanent collections, and then create their own project together. All materials included. Price includes two family members and supplies for one shared project. No children under five; all children must be accompanied by an adult.

categories: Artmaking, Family





Saturday, February 23, 6 pm - 12 am
Helmut Stern Auditorium

"The Dance on Camera Festival is one of those NY stealth events, prized by its devotees...where the allusiveness of dance meets the intimacy of film to create a new kind of magic" --John Rockwell, New York Times

Coming to Ann Arbor directly from Dance Films Association's 41st Dance On Camera Festival in New York City, this screening celebrates the immediacy, energy, and mystery of dance combined with the intimacy of film. DFA's Festival is the oldest dance film festival in the world that sparked a global explosion of activity.

The SMTD@UMMA performance series is made possible in part by the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund.

categories: Film, Performing Arts, Special Events

February 24

Guided Tour

Sunday, February 24, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA's award-winning docents will guide visitors to experience art through active looking at selected highlights of the collections. These general tours provide a good introduction to the collection and to strategies for looking at art through lively and engaging conversation.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, February 24, 2 pm - 3 pm

The major retrospective of internationally renowned artist El Anatsui, presents the largest compilation of his works ever assembled, including massive wall pieces and large-scale floor installations. UMMA docents will place Anatsui in the context of contemporary art and allow visitors to look more closely at the stunning works in the exhibition.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours





Sunday, February 24, 3 pm - 12 am
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Born in Lhasa, Tibet, in 1939, Kyabje Gelek Rimpoche is renowned for the crucial role he has played in the survival of Tibetan Buddhism. Among the last generation of lamas educated in Drepung Monastery, Rimpoche edited and printed over 170 volumes of rare Tibetan manuscripts and, in 1988, founded Jewel Heart to share Tibetan Buddhism and culture. As a result of his thorough knowledge of English and familiarity with modern Western culture, he has been particularly effective as a teacher of Western practitioners of Tibetan Buddhism. His collected works now include close to forty transcripts of his teachings, numerous articles as well as the national bestseller Good Life, Good Death (2001) and The Tara Box: Rituals for Protection and Healing from the Female Buddha (2004).

This talk will also be webstreamed as part of Jewel Heart leader Gelek Rimpoche’s ongoing series of talks about Buddhism.

The exhibition Buddhist Thangkas and Treasures: The Walter Koelz Collection, Museum of Anthropology is part of the UM Collections Collaborations series, co-organized by and presented at UMMA and designed to showcase the renowned and diverse collections at the University of Michigan. The UM Collections Collaborations series is generously supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program





Sunday, February 24, 6 pm - 12 am
Helmut Stern Auditorium

"The Dance on Camera Festival is one of those NY stealth events, prized by its devotees...where the allusiveness of dance meets the intimacy of film to create a new kind of magic" --John Rockwell, New York Times Coming to Ann Arbor directly from Dance Films Association's 41st Dance On Camera Festival in New York City, this screening celebrates the immediacy, energy, and mystery of dance combined with the intimacy of film. DFA's Festival is the oldest dance film festival in the world that sparked a global explosion of activity.

The SMTD@UMMA performance series is made possible in part by the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund.

categories: Film, Special Events

February 28



Thursday, February 28, 12 pm - 12 am
Multipurpose Room

Margaret Root, Professor, Department of History of Art; Curator, U-M Kelsey Museum of Archaeology

In this workshop session a curator describes her vision for a special exhibition at the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, with the working title Ancient Animations: Social Networking in the Persian Empire. She throws out some challenges (intellectual, technical, political, institutional, and financial) that she faces partway through the multi-year planning process. The ambition is to create something that will inspire imaginations and invite discovery about the ancient Persian empire through the mixed use of selected material things coupled with a variety of digital experiences, including video games.

The substantive core of the exhibition content emerges from the seals ratifying thousands of administrative documents that offer windows (through image and text) into personalities and social interactions of real people, their self-presentations, and their networks/networking in about 500 BCE. The subject is ideally suited to digital presentations because of its non-linear data complexities and its frankly beautiful images, that lend themselves to imaginative play; but how will we make it work out? How will we mediate between the traditionally object-based emphasis at the Kelsey Museum and the urgencies of the technologically-driven visions?

Margaret Cool Root is Professor of Near Eastern and Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Michigan, holding teaching appointments in History of Art and in the Interdepartmental Program in Classical Art and Archaeology. She is also Curator of Near Eastern and Greek collections at the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, where she has mounted many exhibitions on a wide range of topics (with accompanying publications). Her many awards include a fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Her research focuses on issues of art, social history, and historiography particularly involving studies of iconography, style, and identity politics. Specialist realms of analysis are the Achaemenid Persian empire and its complex interactions with ancient Greece. More broadly, she pursues studies both in traditions of monumental art, in traditions of seals as vehicles of stylistic and symbolic agency, all with special attention to problems of understanding intersecting circles of cultural engagement across time, place, and historiographically-charged perception.

categories: Special Events





Thursday, February 28, 7 pm - 12 am
Apse

Inspired by the unique religious expression of the Buddhist Thangkas in the exhibition Buddhist Thangkas and Treasures: The Walter Koelz Collection, Museum of Anthropology, the SMTD@UMMA concert series presents Messiaen, Mystic, a concert of works by the last century’s most enigmatic composer, Olivier Messiaen. Over a long career, Messiaen drew upon birdsong, Catholic mysticism, and the profound relationships of music with time and with color to create a style unlike anyone who came before him or who has composed since. UM professors Carmen Pelton, Scott Piper, and Martin Katz perform intimate, ecstatic Messiaen song cycles. The deeply moving Quartet for the End of Time, composed during Messiaen’s stay in a German prisoner-of-war camp during World War II, is performed by UM professors Christopher Harding, piano, Anthony Elliot, cello, Stephen Shipps, violin, and Chad Burrow, clarinet. Composer, organist, and UM professor of music theory Andrew Mead discusses notable elements of Messiaen’s work in a pre-concert lecture.

7 pm pre-concert talk, 8 pm performance

The SMTD@UMMA performance series is made possible in part by the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund.

The exhibition Buddhist Thangkas and Treasures: The Walter Koelz Collection, Museum of Anthropology is part of the UM Collections Collaborations series, co-organized by and presented at UMMA and designed to showcase the renowned and diverse collections at the University of Michigan. The UM Collections Collaborations series is generously supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Performing Arts