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Programs and Tours

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January 6

Guided Tour

Sunday, January 6, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA's award-winning docents will guide visitors to experience art through active looking at selected highlights of the collections. These general tours provide a good introduction to the collection and to strategies for looking at art through lively and engaging conversation.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Benjamin West: General Wolfe and the Art of Empire

Sunday, January 6, 3 pm - 4:30 pm

How is it that an American painter came to define the British Empire? Benjamin West's iconic painting The Death of General Wolfe (1776) depicts the death of James Wolfe, the British commander at the 1759 Battle of Quebec, one of Great Britain's most famous military victories, during what in this country is known as the French and Indian War. Carole McNamara, UMMA Senior Curator of Western Art, will introduce the history and art historical significance of this rich painting which contributed to the “Wolfemania” of the time. Join the conversation about this work that is on loan from the William L. Clements Library at the University of Michigan, before the exhibition closes.

Generous support for this exhibition is provided by the Joseph F. McCrindle Foundation, the University of Michigan Health System, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost and Office of the Vice President for Research, the Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, and THE MOSAIC FOUNDATION (of R. & P. Heydon).

categories: Artists and Curators

January 13

Guided Tour

Sunday, January 13, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA's award-winning docents will guide visitors to experience art through active looking at selected highlights of the collections. These general tours provide a good introduction to the collection and to strategies for looking at art through lively and engaging conversation.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, January 13, 2 pm - 3 pm

How is it that an American painter came to define the British Empire? Benjamin West's iconic painting The Death of General Wolfe (1776) depicts the death of James Wolfe, the British commander at the 1759 Battle of Quebec, one of Great Britain's most famous military victories, during what in this country is known as the French and Indian War. The artist went on to produce six versions of the painting, one of which belongs to the William L. Clements Library at the University of Michigan, on display this fall with approximately forty other works, from Michigan, Canadian, and British collections. Docents will introduce the history and art historical significance of this ambitious exhibition. 

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

January 18

Ann Arbor Art Center Workshops at UMMA

Friday, January 18, 11:10 am - 1 pm
Galleries
$10 one-time drop-in fee (cash only), materials included

This drop-in gallery class offers an opportunity to be more than a spectator at the Museum. With the guidance of the instructor, learn to observe the works in the UMMA collections; experiment with proportion, perspective, line quality, value, composition, and personal style. No experience necessary; all are welcome!

categories: Artmaking





Friday, January 18, 12 pm - 12 am
Multipurpose Room

Ann Shaftel works with, and teaches, the preservation of sacred art around the world - to museum directors, curators, conservators, to university faculty and students as well as to groups of private collectors, dharma students and artists. In this talk Ann addresses the challenges and issues in preserving sacred art. Whether sacred art is defined by its location and existence in a Himalayan monastery, or hooked rugs that are sacred to the history of a small American community historical society, the scientific principles for its preservation remain the same, and the best explanation is a practical explanation.

categories: Special Events



Guided Tour

Friday, January 18, 12:15 pm - 12:45 pm

Designed specifically for the lunch hour, UMMA staff and student docents will offer thirty minutes of conversation about art in the UMMA galleries around fresh, entertaining, and seasonal themes such as, love, heroes, food, and more. Meet at the Information Desk.
 

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Mark Webster Reading Series

Friday, January 18, 7 pm - 8:45 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

One MFA student of fiction and one of poetry, each introduced by a peer, will read from their work. The Mark Webster Reading Series presents emerging writers in a warm and relaxed setting. We encourage you to bring your friends—a Webster reading makes for an enjoyable and enlightening Friday evening.

categories: UM Student Programs, Writers Series

January 19



Saturday, January 19, 11:15 am - 11:45 am

Children ages four to seven are invited to hear a story in the galleries. Student docents and UMMA staff will bring art to life as they read stories related to the art on display and invite responses from our youngest patrons. Each story is followed by a short art activity. Parents must accompany children. Siblings are welcome to join the group. Meet at the Information Desk.

categories: Family, Gallery Talks and Tours



Ann Arbor Art Center Workshops at UMMA

Saturday, January 19, 1 pm - 4 pm
Multipurpose Room
$28 UMMA and AAAC members and UM students/$35 non-members; lab fee $15, materials included. Advance registration required by Wednesday, January 16. Register online at annarborartcenter.org.

Guided by an Ann Arbor Art Center instructor, families will learn how to talk about what they see and how to create art themselves. In this workshop, parents and children will explore an artist, artifact, or art movement from the permanent collections, and then create their own project together. All materials included. Price includes two family members and supplies for one shared project. No children under five; all children must be accompanied by an adult.

categories: Family



SMTD@UMMA

Saturday, January 19, 1 pm - 4 pm

This year’s SMTD@UMMA Installation Concert explores the way we talk about music and art, anchored by seven terms common to both: tone, line, texture, color, volume, contrast, and shape. Guided by UM composition faculty Kristin Kuster, STMD graduate composition students imaginatively develop new works on each of these terms, which are premiered by student ensembles in spaces throughout the Museum. UMMA student docents provide suggestions about works on view that these terms call to mind.

The SMTD@UMMA performance series is made possible in part by the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund.

categories: Performing Arts

January 20

Guided Tour

Sunday, January 20, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA's award-winning docents will guide visitors to experience art through active looking at selected highlights of the collections. These general tours provide a good introduction to the collection and to strategies for looking at art through lively and engaging conversation.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, January 20, 2 pm - 3 pm

African Art and the Shape of Time explores how African art gives material form to diverse concepts of temporality, history, and memory. It complicates conventional views of African art by considering diverse modes for reckoning time and its philosophical, social, and religious significance. Docents will discuss the five themes that explore the multiplicity of time in Africa: The Beginning of Things, Embodied Time, Moving Through Time, Global Time, and NOW. 

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Special Event

Sunday, January 20, 3 pm - 5 pm
Reservations required at umma-tours@umich.edu.

Join Institute for the Humanities graduate student fellow A. Sheree Brown in a conversation focusing on the visual culture resources UMMA created for the LSA Theme Semester, Understanding Race. Twenty-two works of art found in the galleries, display cases, and study rooms have been selected to illuminate the complexity of conceptions and representations of race within several cultures. Even if you are familiar with the objects in question, you will appreciate the fresh approach to this material. Brown will explore these objects and engage visitors in conversation about their genesis and interpretation.

Understanding Race UMMA Teaching and Learning materials were created by Summer 2012 UM Arts of Citizenship fellow and history/women’s studies PhD.student Ángela Pérez-Villa, and will also be used by faculty and students in the course of the theme semester.

More information about the theme semester and related activities are available at http://understandingraceproject.org/.

categories: Special Events

January 22

Special Event

Tuesday, January 22, 5:15 pm - 7:15 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

In this lecture, Peter H. Wood, emeritus professor of history at Duke University, explores Near Andersonville, an important work by Winslow Homer—one of America’s most famous and admired artists who rose to prominence as a young illustrator during the Civil War. In a 1988 landmark exhibition, Wood and Karen Dalton brought attention to the fact that many of Homer’s most significant works from the Civil War and Reconstruction years focused on African Americans, both enslaved and free. Wood has continued to pursue this theme of Homer’s black images. “For me,” Dr. Wood observes, “Near Andersonville is a revolutionary painting in the world of American art. Only now, a century and half later, are we beginning to understand its significance, its implications, and its ongoing relevance.”

This program is part of the Understanding Race LSA Theme Semester and is cosponsored by the Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design Witt Visiting Artist Program and the University of Michigan Museum of Art. For more information about the theme semester please visit http://understandingraceproject.org/.

categories: Special Events

January 23

Writers Series

Wednesday, January 23, 6:10 pm - 8 pm
Apse

Reception and booksigning in the Forum from 5 to 6 pm

Heather McHugh is Pollock Professor of Poetry at the University of Washington, and a core faculty participant in the low-residency MFA at Warren Wilson College in Asheville, North Carolina. Of her many books of translation, poetry, and essays, the most recent are Upgraded to Serious, Glottal Stop (poems of Paul Celan, with co-translator Nikolai Popov), and Broken English: poetry and partiality. She's a former chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and was in 2009 awarded a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellowship. In 2012 she founded the non-profit CAREGIFTED, which supports respite services for long-term full-time family caregivers (http://caregifted.org/).

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Department of English Program in Creative Writing Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell (’64). For more information, please see http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp

categories: Writers Series

January 24



Thursday, January 24
Helmut Stern Auditorium

The Jim Crow Museum (JCM) began as the personal project of then-Sociology Professor David Pilgrim, and grew out of his collection of more than 3,000 segregation-related artifacts. After using items from the collection with the students in his Race Relations course and seeing the learning it produced, Professor Pilgrim sought to make his collection publically accessible by donating it to Ferris State University. Since its inception in 1996 and the creation of its website in 2000, the JCM has become a national and internationally recognized resource for students, teachers, researchers, scholars, human rights workers, the national media, and other seeking a deeper understanding of race relations. The museum enables visitors to understand that we "learn" racism through the common, ordinary objects that both shaped and reflected attitudes about race, race relations, and racism—and continue to do so today. By presenting these objects within a historical framework, the JCM promotes intelligent and open discussions. The museum's dual commitment to academic rigor and social justice are reflected in its mission, "to use objects of intolerance to teach tolerance and promote social justice."

Professor Pilgrim, the museum's founder and current curator, will discuss the museum's mission and vision, and its strategy of using historical and contemporary race-based artifacts to teach about race, race relations, and racism. Participants are warned that this presentation contains images that some people find offensive.

Dr. Pilgrim is an applied sociologist with a doctorate from The Ohio State University and one of this country's leading experts on issues relating to multiculturalism, diversity, and race relations. He has been interviewed by National Public Radio, Time magazine, the British Broadcasting Corporation, and dozens of newspapers. Dr. Pilgrim is best known as the founder and curator of the Jim Crow Museum - a 9,000 piece collection of racist artifacts located at Ferris State University. The museum uses objects of intolerance to teach tolerance. Dr. Pilgrim's writings, many found on the museum's web site (www.ferris.edu/jimcrow), are used by scholars, students, and civil rights workers to better understand historical and contemporary expressions of racism. The web site has been linked to hundreds of sites and has resulted in Dr. Pilgrim being invited to deliver public lectures at many institutions, including Colby College, Stanford University, Spring Arbor College, the University of Michigan, Smith College, and the University of North Carolina. In 2004, he produced with Clayton Rye the documentary Jim Crow's Museum to explain his approach to battling racism. The film won several awards including Best Documentary at the 2004 Flint Film Festival and is shown nationally on affiliates of the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). In 2012, Dr. Pilgrim received the Robert M. Duncan Alumni Citizenship Award (The Ohio State University), given to an alumnus who has "exemplified education for citizenship."

categories: Special Events



Writers Series

Thursday, January 24, 5:10 pm - 7:30 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Heather McHugh is Pollock Professor of Poetry at the University of Washington, and a core faculty participant in the low-residency MFA at Warren Wilson College in Asheville, North Carolina. Of her many books of translation, poetry, and essays, the most recent are Upgraded to Serious, Glottal Stop (poems of Paul Celan, with co-translator Nikolai Popov), and Broken English: poetry and partiality. She's a former chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and was in 2009 awarded a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellowship. In 2012 she founded the non-profit CAREGIFTED, which supports respite services for long-term full-time family caregivers (http://caregifted.org/).

The author will be available to sign books after the lecture. As always, books will be available for purchase on site.

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Department of English Program in Creative Writing Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell (’64). For more information, please see http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp

categories: Writers Series

January 25

Ann Arbor Art Center Workshops at UMMA

Friday, January 25, 11:10 am - 1 pm
Galleries
$10 one-time drop-in fee (cash only), materials included

This drop-in gallery class offers an opportunity to be more than a spectator at the Museum. With the guidance of the instructor, learn to observe the works in the UMMA collections; experiment with proportion, perspective, line quality, value, composition, and personal style. No experience necessary; all are welcome!

categories: Artmaking



Special Event

Friday, January 25, 4 pm - 6 pm
Multipurpose Room

This program centers upon a lacquer and gold-leaf decorated Burmese harp, or saung-gauk. Carved from the root of the saung tree, this particular harp was donated by UM alumna Patricia Matusky-Yamaguchi to the University of Michigan Museum of Art after it was painstakingly restored by Clifton Monteith using lacquer and gold leaf. Clifton Monteith, an artist inspired by nature in both form and material, and Judith Becker, an expert on Southeast Asian music, will discuss the restoration and the cultural context of this important instrument. The harp, not yet on display at UMMA, will be on view before the lecture from 3:30 to 4 pm in the Object Study Room (lower level).

Monteith has studied traditional lacquer technique in Japan since 1994 and has incorporated this material in his own artwork, mostly furniture, lanterns, and vessels—all sculptural pieces made with natural materials.

Becker, professor emerita of ethnomusicology, is an expert on Southeast Asian music, including the classical Burmese music for which this harp was used. Her most recent book is Deep Listeners: Music, Emotion, and Trancing (2004).

This lecture coincides with a special presentation of lacquerware made in Japan and the Ryukyu Islands from the Muromachi to Edo periods in the Japanese Gallery at the Museum. The presentation is supported by the Center for Japanese Studies.

Cosponsored by the Center for Southeast Asian Studies, the Center for Japanese Studies, and the University of Michigan Museum of Art.

categories: Special Events

January 26



Saturday, January 26, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

This symposium will address the presence of Chinese folk pottery in the modern worldâ??its traditions, its methods, its practitioners, and its future. Through the presentation of lectures and films, two distinguished Chinese ceramic artists and a scholar of Chinese art and archeology will offer their knowledge and views of the field, informing our understanding of the role of Chinese folk pottery in historical and contemporary contexts. The Symposium intends to promote a fuller interpretation of this work and a deeper comprehension of its origins, processes, and influences. The symposium and film coincides with the special presentation of the Chinese Folk Pottery: The Art of the Everyday in the Shirley Chang Gallery of Asian Art.

This presentation is sponsored by the Confucius Institute at U-M, Hsu Arts Beijing, Center for Chinese Studies at U-M, and UMMA.

categories: Special Events

January 27

Guided Tour

Sunday, January 27, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA's award-winning docents will guide visitors to experience art through active looking at selected highlights of the collections. These general tours provide a good introduction to the collection and to strategies for looking at art through lively and engaging conversation.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, January 27, 2 pm - 3 pm

Join docents as they explore the exciting installation by Argentina-born, Los Angeles-based architect and designer Florencia Pita. Pita's boldly colored works draw from literary, art, and biological sources, employ cutting-edge arcitectural fabrication techniques; and cross borders of visual art, architecture and design. 

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

January 31

Special Event

Thursday, January 31, 5:10 pm - 7:15 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Colson Whitehead’s novels and essays tackle the questions of race, class, and commercial culture with candor and wit. He has been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and a recipient of several awards including the Whiting Writers’ Award and the MacArthur “Genius” Award. He is the author of six books. His first novel, The Intuitionist, was published in 1998 and was a finalist for the PEN/Hemmingway Award. According to Time it’s the “freshest racial allegory since Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man" and GQ named it one of the “novels of the millennium.” John Henry Days, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award, was published in 2001 and his non-fiction homage to New York, The Colossus of New York, was published in 2003. His most recent novel Zone One was published in October 2011. The Washington Post described this latest bestseller as “a zombie story with brains” and the New York Times selected it as an Editor’s Pick calling it “cool” and “thoughtful.”

Colson’s reviews, essays, and fiction have appeared in a great many publications, such as the New York Times, The New Yorker, Harper's, and Granta. He has spoken across the country and has taught courses at several universities including Columbia, Princeton, and the University of Houston. Esquire magazine has called him “the coolest writer in America” and more than 116,000 people follow him on Twitter.

The author will be available to sign books after the lecture. As always, books will be available for purchase on site.

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Department of English Program in Creative Writing Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell (’64). For more information, please see http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp

categories: Writers Series



Penny W. Stamps Speaker Series

Thursday, January 31, 5:10 pm - 12 am
Historic Theater, Michigan Theater
603 E. Liberty

Ann Arbor, MI 48104

Lisa Strausfeld is currently Global Head of Data Visualization at Bloomberg where she was hired in 2012 to build and lead a new team dedicated to creating consumer-focused interactive data products. From 2002 to 2011 Lisa was a partner at Pentagram specializing in digital information design projects. Lisa was a recipient of The National Design Award for Interaction Design in 2010. In her presentation, Lisa discusses “Why data visualization? Why now?” -- defining the attributes of successful data visualizations and how can they be generalized to other design media.

Events in the Penny Stamps series are always free of charge and open to the public.

Established with the generous support of UM School of Art and Design alumna Penny W. Stamps, the Stamps Speaker Series brings respected emerging and established artists/designers from a broad spectrum of media to the School to conduct a public lecture and engage with students, faculty, and the larger University and Ann Arbor communities. Additional support is provided by our media sponsor, Michigan Radio.

categories: Special Events