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December 1

Special Event

Saturday, December 1

Day Without Art (DWA) began on December 1,1989 as the national day of action and mourning in response to the AIDS crisis. To make the public aware that AIDS can touch everyone, and to inspire positive action, some 800 US art and AIDS groups participated in the first Day Without Art, shutting down museums, sending staff to volunteer at AIDS services, or sponsoring special exhibitions of work about AIDS. Since then, Day With(out) Art has grown into a collaborative project in which an estimated 8,000 national and international museums, galleries, art centers, AIDS Service Organizations, libraries, high schools, and colleges take part.

In the past, Visual AIDS initiated public actions and programs, published an annual poster and copyright-free broadsides, and acted as press coordinator and clearinghouse for projects for Day Without Art/World AIDS Day. In 1997 they suggested Day Without Art become a Day WITH Art, to recognize and promote increased programming of cultural events that draw attention to the continuing pandemic. Though "the name was retained as a metaphor for the chilling possibility of a future day without art or artists", they added parentheses to the program title, Day With(out) Art, to highlight the proactive programming of art projects by artists living with HIV/AIDS, and art about AIDS, that were taking place around the world. It had become clear that active interventions within the annual program were far more effective than actions to negate or reduce the programs of cultural centers.

For more information, visit http://www.visualaids.org/

categories: Special Events





Saturday, December 1, 11:15 am - 11:45 am

Children ages four to seven are invited to hear a story in the galleries. Student docents and UMMA staff will bring art to life as they read stories related to the art on display and invite responses from our youngest patrons. Each story is followed by a short art activity. Parents must accompany children. Siblings are welcome to join the group. Meet at the Information Desk.

categories: Family, Gallery Talks and Tours



SMTD@UMMA

Saturday, December 1, 7 pm - 9 pm
Apse

In conjunction with the UMMA exhibition African Art and the Shape of Time, which explores notions of time and timelessness in the study of African art, director Christopher Lees leads the Contemporary Directions Ensemble in the performance of musical experiments in recurrence and linear time, featuring composers Chen Yi, Nico Muhly and UM Composition Professors Paul Schoenfield and Bright Sheng.

The SMTD@UMMA performance series is made possible in part by the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund.

Lead support for the exhibition African Art and the Shape of Time is provided by the University of Michigan Health System and the James L. and Vivian A. Curtis Endowment Fund. Additional generous support is provided by the CEW Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Fund.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Performing Arts

December 2

Guided Tour

Sunday, December 2, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA's award-winning docents will guide visitors to experience art through active looking at selected highlights of the collections. These general tours provide a good introduction to the collection and to strategies for looking at art through lively and engaging conversation.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, December 2, 2 pm - 3 pm

African Art and the Shape of Time explores how African art gives material form to diverse concepts of temporality, history, and memory. It complicates conventional views of African art by considering diverse modes for reckoning time and its philosophical, social, and religious significance. Docents will discuss the five themes that explore the multiplicity of time in Africa: The Beginning of Things, Embodied Time, Moving Through Time, Global Time, and NOW. 

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

December 4

Film

Tuesday, December 4, 7 pm - 9 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Ai Weiwei is China's most famous international artist, and its most outspoken domestic critic. Against a backdrop of strict censorship and an unresponsive legal system, Ai expresses himself and organizes people through art and social media. In response, Chinese authorities have shut down his blog, beat him up, bulldozed his newly built studio, and held him in secret detention. Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry is the inside story of a dissident for the digital age who inspires global audiences and blurs the boundaries of art and politics. First-time director Alison Klayman gained unprecedented access to Ai while working as a journalist in China. Her detailed portrait provides a nuanced exploration of contemporary China and one of its most compelling public figures. For more information about the film, visit http://aiweiweineversorry.com/. (2012, 91 min.)

Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry is being presented as part of the film series Examining Heroes and Icons, which UMMA is offering in conjunction with the exhibition Benjamin West: General Wolfe and the Art of Empire (on view September 22, 2012 through January 13, 2013), focusing on the idea of heroes and exploring ways in which heroes are defined through images.

This film series is curated by the UMMA Student Programming and Advisory Council and cosponsored by MFlicks and the University Musical Society (UMS).

Generous support for the exhibition Benjamin West: General Wolfe and the Art of Empire is provided by the Joseph F. McCrindle Foundation, the University of Michigan Health System, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost and Office of the Vice President for Research, the Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, and THE MOSAIC FOUNDATION (of R. & P. Heydon).

categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Film

December 5

Special Event

Wednesday, December 5, 5:30 pm - 7 pm
Multipurpose Room

As part of their exciting new Hub lecture series, the Institute for the Humanities offers a visit to the UMMA Jesper Just exhibition entitled This Nameless Spectacle (on view through December 9), followed by an engaging discussion about time, narrative, and voyeurism in video, with Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design professors Y. David Chung, Osman Khan, and Lily Cox-Richard, and Institute for the Humanities curator Amanda Krugliak. Y. David Chung is a past Institute fellow and visiting artist, and Lily Cox-Richard is currently a member of the society of fellows, and will be an IH visiting artist in 2013.

Audiences are invited to enjoy the exhibition in the New Media Gallery from 5:30 to 6pm. The discussion will follow in the Multipurpose Room.

Generous support for the exhibition Jesper Just: This Nameless Spectacle is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Special Events

December 6

Penny W. Stamps Speaker Series

Thursday, December 6
Historic Theater, Michigan Theater
603 E. Liberty

Ann Arbor, MI 48104

UNITED IN ANGER: A HISTORY OF ACT UP is a unique feature-length documentary that combines startling archival footage with remarkably insightful interviews from the ACT UP Oral History Project to explore ACT UP (the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power) from a grassroots perspective. The film takes the viewer through the planning and execution of a dozen major actions, including Seize Control of the FDA, Stop the Church, and Day of Desperation, with a timeline of many of the other zaps and actions that forced the US government and mainstream media to deal with the AIDS crisis. UNITED IN ANGER reveals the group’s complex culture—meetings, affinity groups, and approaches to civil disobedience mingle with profound grief, sexiness, and the incredible energy of ACT UP. Before there was Occupy Wall Street or the Arab Spring, there was ACT UP.

With support from the UM Screen Arts and Cultures, UM School of Public Health, UM Romance Languages and Literatures, Ann Arbor Film Festival, HARC HIV/AIDS Resource Center, Visual AIDS New York.

Established with the generous support of UM School of Art and Design , Penny W. Stamps, the Stamps Speaker Series brings respected emerging and established artists/designers from a broad spectrum of media to the School to conduct a public lecture and engage with students, faculty, and the larger University and Ann Arbor communities. Additional support is provided by our media sponsor, Michigan Radio.

Events in the Penny Stamps series are always free of charge and open to the public.

categories: Special Events



Writers Series

Thursday, December 6, 5:10 pm - 8 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Amitav Ghosh was born in Calcutta and grew up in India, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. He studied in Delhi, Oxford, and Alexandria and is the author of The Circle of Reason, The Shadow Lines, In An Antique Land, Dancing in Cambodia, The Calcutta Chromosome, The Glass Palace, The Hungry Tide, Sea of Poppies, and most recently, River of Smoke (2011), which is the second volume of a projected series of novels, The Ibis Trilogy. The Circle of Reason was awarded France’s Prix Médicis in 1990, and The Shadow Lines won two prestigious Indian prizes the same year, the Sahitya Akademi Award and the Ananda Puraskar. The Calcutta Chromosome won the Arthur C. Clarke award for 1997 and The Glass Palace won the International e-Book Award at the Frankfurt book fair in 2001. In 2005 The Hungry Tide won the Crossword Book Prize, and in 2008 Sea of Poppies was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and was awarded the Crossword Book Prize and the IndiaPlaza Golden Quill Award.

Amitav Ghosh’s work has been translated into more than two dozen languages and he has served on the jury of the Locarno Film Festival (Switzerland) and the Venice Film Festival (2001). Amitav Ghosh’s essays have been published in The New Yorker, The New Republic and the New York Times. He has taught in many universities in India and the US, including Delhi University, Columbia University, Queens College and Harvard University. In January 2007 he was given the Padma Shri, one of India’s highest honors, by the President of India. In 2010, Amitav Ghosh was awarded honorary doctorates by Queens College, New York, and the Sorbonne, Paris. Along with Margaret Atwood, he was also a joint winner of a Dan David Award for 2010.

The author will be available to sign books after the reading. As always, books will be available for purchase on site.

Cosponsored by the Michigan Quarterly Review

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Department of English Program in Creative Writing Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell (’64). For more information, please see http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp

categories: Writers Series



Special Event

Thursday, December 6, 7 pm - 8:45 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Necessary or Accessory? Perspectives on the Object in Today's Museums

The Object, the Objective: Reconsidering the Role of Collections at the Chicago History Museum

John Russick, Director of Curatorial Affairs, Chicago History Museum

With a collection of millions of objects, images, and documents, the Chicago History Museum is in the midst of a multi-part effort to reinvest in the Museum's collection. This new focus is taking shape in three primary forms - a commitment to address significant backlog collections; the development of a new institutional plan to guide future collecting; and, an unprecedented multi-phase research project to discover the potential values of objects for visitors. This presentation will explore how these three projects have forced the Museum to reconsider some old assumptions about the power of objects, the role of material culture in attracting and holding the attention of visitors, the nature of collecting in future decades, and the very future of history exhibitions.

John Russick directs all curatorial initiatives for the Chicago History Museum. He has twenty-four years of museum experience including positions at Chicago's Field Museum and the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in History from Northern Illinois University (1987) and a Master of Science in Architectural Studies and Historic Preservation from the University of Texas at Austin (1996). Over the past 15 years, Russick has led the development of a dozen exhibitions at CHM, including the family exhibition, Magic (2012), the children's exhibition, Sensing Chicago (2006); and the costume exhibition, Fashion, Flappers 'n All That Jazz (2001). His most recent publication, Connecting Kids to History with Museum Exhibitions (Left Coast Press, 2010) was co-edited with D. Lynn McRainey. Russick served as a consultant on the 2011 Florentine Films documentary, Prohibition, directed by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick. Since 2009 he has organized the American Association of Museum's annual Excellence in Exhibition Label Writing Competition. He served as Vice Chair of the Chicago History Museum‘s Visioning Committee, an initiative that culminated with the publication of Claiming Chicago: Shaping Our Future (2007). He has won awards for both his preservation work and his exhibition label writing.

categories: Special Events

December 9

Guided Tour

Sunday, December 9, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA's award-winning docents will guide visitors to experience art through active looking at selected highlights of the collections. These general tours provide a good introduction to the collection and to strategies for looking at art through lively and engaging conversation.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, December 9, 2 pm - 3 pm

Join docents as they explore a new UMMA-commissioned installation by the Seoul-based art collaborative, Young-Hae Chang Heavy Industries (YHCHI). This collaborative is known for innovative video works that exist at the nexus of visual art and digital literature. Blurring the boundaries between media, technologies, and cultural histories, YHCHI has gained international acclaim for their "net art" productions—mostly black- and-white videos of quickly flashing capitalized text in a generic font with synchronized music—which can be seen on the artists' website, yhchang.com.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

December 11

Film

Tuesday, December 11, 7 pm - 9 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Does each gesture really make a difference? Can music and dance be weapons of peace? In 2003, on the eve of the Iraq war, director Iara Lee embarked on a journey to better understand a world increasingly embroiled in conflict and, as she saw it, heading for self-destruction. After several years, traveling over five continents, Iara encountered growing numbers of people who committed their lives to promoting change. This is their story. From Iran, where graffiti and rap became tools in fighting government repression, to Burma, where monks acting in the tradition of Gandhi take on a dictatorship, moving on to Brazil, where musicians reach out to slum kids and transform guns into guitars, and ending in Palestinian refugee camps in Lebanon, where photography, music, and film have given a voice to those rarely heard, Cultures Of Resistance explores how art and creativity can be ammunition in the battle for peace and justice.

Featuring: Medellín poets for peace, Capoeira masters from Brazil, Niger Delta militants, Iranian graffiti artists, women’s movement leaders in Rwanda, Lebanon’s refugee filmmakers, US political pranksters, indigenous Kayapó activists from the Xingu River, Israeli dissidents, hip-hop artists from Palestine, and many more. For more information about the film, visit http://films.culturesofresistance.org/. (2011, 73 min.)

Cultures of Resistance is being presented as part of the film series Examining Heroes and Icons, which UMMA is offering in conjunction with the exhibition Benjamin West: General Wolfe and the Art of Empire (on view September 22, 2012 until January 13, 2013), focusing on the idea of heroes and exploring ways in which heroes are defined through images.

This film series is curated by the UMMA Student Programming and Advisory Council and cosponsored by MFlicks and the University Musical Society (UMS).

Generous support for the exhibition Benjamin West: General Wolfe and the Art of Empire is provided by the Joseph F. McCrindle Foundation, the University of Michigan Health System, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost and Office of the Vice President for Research, the Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, and THE MOSAIC FOUNDATION (of R. & P. Heydon).

categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Film

December 16

Guided Tour

Sunday, December 16, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA's award-winning docents will guide visitors to experience art through active looking at selected highlights of the collections. These general tours provide a good introduction to the collection and to strategies for looking at art through lively and engaging conversation.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, December 16, 2 pm - 3 pm

How is it that an American painter came to define the British Empire? Benjamin West's iconic painting The Death of General Wolfe (1776) depicts the death of James Wolfe, the British commander at the 1759 Battle of Quebec, one of Great Britain's most famous military victories, during what in this country is known as the French and Indian War. The artist went on to produce six versions of the painting, one of which belongs to the William L. Clements Library at the University of Michigan, on display this fall with approximately forty other works, from Michigan, Canadian, and British collections. Docents will introduce the history and art historical significance of this ambitious exhibition. 

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours