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October 2

Special Event

Tuesday, October 2, 5 pm - 7 pm
Multipurpose Room

The Department of the History of Art, in collaboration with the Nineteenth-Century Forum, the Department of English, and the University of Michigan Museum of Art, is pleased to present a guest lecture by Caroline Arscott, Professor and Head of Research at the Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London.

Since conception in the nineteenth century, British artist William Morris’s designs for hand-knotted carpets have primarily been discussed in terms of their naturalism and abstraction. Rather than focusing on this polarity, however, Professor Arscott will consider Morris’s intimations of action, which the artist associated with the pictorial and which he considered to be one of the great resources of oriental carpet design. Professor Arscott will address the knot as it relates to the substance of the pile and the interlace of the design, in addition to its significance for Victorian mathematics. She seeks to establish the ways in which ornament can function as a mode of the pictorial in an Arts and Crafts context. Her approach is international in scope, and will include a consideration of Morris’s sources in Safavidic carpet design as well as his awareness of Riegl's discussion of cloud band motifs in carpets.

categories: Artists and Curators, Special Events

October 4

Writers Series

Thursday, October 4, 5:10 pm - 6:30 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Hanna Pylväinen graduated from Mount Holyoke College and received her MFA from the University of Michigan, where she was also a postgraduate Zell Fellow. She is the recipient of residencies at the MacDowell Colony and the Headlands Center for the Arts, and a fellowship at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Massachusetts. Her first novel, We Sinners, was released by Henry Holt in August 2012. She is from suburban Detroit.

Rachel Richardson is the author of Copperhead (Carnegie Mellon, 2011). She grew up in Berkeley, California, and earned an MFA in poetry from the University of Michigan, where she won the Theodore Roethke Prize. She also received an MA in Folklore from the University of North Carolina and held a Wallace Stegner Fellowship at Stanford. Her poems have appeared in the Southern Review, New England Review, Ninth Letter, Shenandoah, and elsewhere. She has taught in several prisons, public schools, and universities, and now lives in Greensboro, North Carolina with her family.

The authors will be available to sign books after the reading. As always, books will be available for purchase on site.

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Department of English Program in Creative Writing Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell (’64). For more information, please see http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp.

categories: Writers Series



Penny W. Stamps Speaker Series

Thursday, October 4, 5:10 pm - 7 pm
Historic Theater, Michigan Theater
603 E. Liberty

Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Events in the Penny Stamps series are always free of charge and open to the public.

Peter Hirshberg is at the forefront of an ‘urban prototyping’ movement exploring how design, art and technology can serve as tools for civic participation. His work emphasizes the value of collaboration between artists and their cities as a “super catalyst” for the community-building process in creating a new form of urban experience through access and engagement. Hirshberg has pioneered civic innovation programs in San Francisco and Singapore, has addressed the UN General Assembly on the application of big data to global economic development, and is now creating new media, art and data properties to make neighborhoods more engaging and attractive to economic investment.

With support from Dlectricity - Detroit's Nighttime Exhibition of Art & Light, UM Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning.

Established with the generous support of alumna Penny W. Stamps, the Speaker Series brings respected emerging and established artists/designers from a broad spectrum of media to the School to conduct a public lecture and engage with students, faculty, and the larger University and Ann Arbor communities. Additional support is provided by our media sponsor, Michigan Radio.

categories: Artists and Curators, Special Events

October 5

Ann Arbor Art Center Workshops at UMMA

Friday, October 5, 11:10 am - 1 pm
Galleries
Fridays, September 28–November 16, 2012, 11:10 am–1 pm
Instructor: Heather Accurso
$10 one-time drop-in fee (cash only), materials included Pre-register for all 8 classes: $72 UMMA and AAAC members and UM students / $80 non-members, materials included. Register online at annarborartcenter.org.
Pick up materials at the information desk.

This drop-in gallery class offers an opportunity to be more than an observer at the Museum. With the guidance of the instructor, learn to observe the works in the UMMA collections; experiment with proportion, perspective, line quality, value, composition, and personal style. No experience necessary; all are welcome!

categories: Artmaking

October 6

Ann Arbor Art Center Workshops at UMMA

Saturday, October 6, 1 pm - 4 pm
$28 UMMA and AAAC members and UM students/$35 non-members; lab fee $15, materials included. Advance registration required by Wednesday, October 3. Register online at annarborartcenter.org.

Explore an artist, artifact, or art movement from the permanent collection with an Ann Arbor Art Center Instructor. Students will start with a blank canvas that, inspired by the collection, transforms into something else! No experience necessary, all levels welcome.

categories: Artmaking

October 7

Special Event

Sunday, October 7, 11:30 am - 1 pm
Galleries
To register for this free program, email umma-tours@umich.edu or call 734-647-0522 for more information.

In 2009, working in partnership with memory loss programs at University of Michigan and Saint Joseph Mercy Health Systems, the Museum launched the pilot program for Meet Me at UMMA, a unique museum-based program designed to engage visitors who are living with dementia. This fall Meet Me at UMMA will launch a new program open to persons with memory loss who live at home and their significant other or caregiver.

Meet Me at UMMA is based on the premise that, although memory may have been compromised, senses are generally alive and well. Facilitated by a small group of experienced UMMA Docents using a multi-sensory approach, the tours offer community members with dementia and their caregivers an opportunity to "bring their senses alive" through visual art, often complemented by music, props, and creative artmaking.

categories: Special Events



Guided Tour

Sunday, October 7, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA's award-winning docents will guide visitors to experience art through active looking at selected highlights of the collections. These general tours provide a good introduction to the collection and to strategies for looking at art through lively and engaging conversation.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, October 7, 2 pm - 3 pm

Blurring the boundaries between media, technologies, and cultural histories, the Seoul-based art collaborative YOUNG-HAE CHANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES has gained international acclaim for their "net art" productions. Docents will introduce YHCHI’s corpus of digital text with synchronized music focusing on this new piece, commissioned by UMMA, which will be added to the artists' website, yhchang.com.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Discovering Eighteenth-Century British America: The William L. Clements Library Collection

Sunday, October 7, 3 pm - 4:30 pm
A. Alfred Taubman Gallery I
This program is free and open to the public, but space is limited. Please register to secure your place by emailing umma-tours@umich.edu.

Exhibition curators Brian Leigh Dunnigan and Clayton Lewis will lead this in-gallery program for adults. Their jointly curated exhibition, Discovering Eighteenth-Century British America: The William L. Clements Library Collection draws on the rich collection of early printed and manuscript Americana held by the University of Michigan's Clements Library, where both are curators. The maps, prints, and documents on display demonstrate the means by which information about America was conveyed to a European audience. This informal gallery talk will offer an opportunity to look more closely at the items in the exhibition, placing them in the context of the visual and print culture of the time.

This exhibition is generously supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program

October 9

Film

Tuesday, October 9, 7 pm - 8:45 pm
Multipurpose Room

In celebration of the 100th anniversary of the explosive debut of Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring", UMS will screen a mash-up of different versions of the "Rite of Spring" from different choreographers.

This program is part of the UMS on Film series designed to expand understanding of the artists and cultures represented on the UMS season and reveal something of the emotions and ideas behind the creative process. For more information, please visit http://www.ums.org.

categories: Film

October 11

Writers Series

Thursday, October 11, 5:10 pm - 6:30 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

David Shields is the author of twelve books, including Jeff, One Lonely Guy, which was co-written by Jeff Ragsdale and Michael Logan (forthcoming from Amazon Publishing NYC on March 20, 2012); Reality Hunger: A Manifesto (Knopf, 2010), named one of the best books of the year by more than thirty publications; The Thing About Life Is That One Day You'll Be Dead (Knopf, 2008), a New York Times bestseller; Black Planet: Facing Race during an NBA Season, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award; Remote: Reflections on Life in the Shadow of Celebrity, winner of the PEN/Revson Award; and Dead Languages: A Novel, winner of the PEN Syndicated Fiction Award. His essays and stories have appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Harper’s, Esquire, Yale Review, Village Voice, Salon, Slate, McSweeney’s, and Utne Reader; he’s written reviews for the New York Times Book Review, Los Angeles Times Book Review, Boston Globe, and Philadelphia Inquirer. His work has been translated into fifteen languages.

Shields has received a Guggenheim fellowship, two NEA fellowships, an Ingram Merrill Foundation Award, a Ludwig Vogelstein Foundation grant, and a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship. He lives with his wife and daughter in Seattle, where he is the Milliman Distinguished Writer-in-Residence at the University of Washington. Since 1996 he has also been a member of the faculty in Warren Wilson College’s low-residency MFA Program for Writers, in Asheville, North Carolina.

The author will be available to sign books after the reading. As always, books will be available for purchase on site.

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Department of English Program in Creative Writing Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell (’64). For more information, please see http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp.

categories: Writers Series



Penny W. Stamps Speaker Series

Thursday, October 11, 5:10 pm - 1 pm
Historic Theater, Michigan Theater
603 E. Liberty

Ann Arbor, MI 48104

Seoul-based artist duo YOUNG-HAE CHANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES (YHCHI) have become known for their online and installation video work that questions contemporary social and cultural conditions, using black and white text and upbeat music. To coincide with their solo exhibition at UMMA, YHCHI will deliver a Penny Stamps talk designed especially for students interested in an artistic career. These internationally acclaimed artists, whose works have been shown at the Tate Modern in London and the Centre Pompidou in Paris, will share their creative secrets: “What we have to say will change your lives... you’ll never be the same.”?

Lead support for this exhibition is provided by the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, and the Nam Center for Korean Studies. Additional generous support is provided by the Dr. Robert and Janet Miller Fund and the School of Art & Design's Penny Stamps Speaker Series.

categories: Artists and Curators, Exhibitions Related Program, Special Events



Special Event

Thursday, October 11, 7 pm - 9 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

The Museum Studies Program's Lecture Series Necessary or Accessory? Perspectives on the Object in Today's Museums presents this lecture by Graham W.J. Beal, Director Detroit Institute of Arts. In this presentation, Graham Beal addresses the multiple purposes behind the creation of Diego Rivera’s Detroit Industry Murals at the Detroit Institute of Arts as well as its changes in meaning within a city that went from being “the arsenal of democracy” to a poster child for urban decay. Beal will also discuss how individual works of art, conceived as being rare and singular, retain their power as visual objects when contextualized and confronted with increasingly sophisticated reproduction techniques.

Co-sponsored by the University of Michigan Museum of Art

categories: Special Events

October 12

Ann Arbor Art Center Workshops at UMMA

Friday, October 12, 11:10 am - 1 pm
Galleries
Fridays, September 28–November 16, 2012, 11:10 am–1 pm
Instructor: Heather Accurso
$10 one-time drop-in fee (cash only), materials included Pre-register for all 8 classes: $72 UMMA and AAAC members and UM students / $80 non-members, materials included. Register online at annarborartcenter.org.
Pick up materials at the information desk.

This drop-in gallery class offers an opportunity to be more than an observer at the Museum. With the guidance of the instructor, learn to observe the works in the UMMA collections; experiment with proportion, perspective, line quality, value, composition, and personal style. No experience necessary; all are welcome!

categories:

October 14

Guided Tour

Sunday, October 14, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA's award-winning docents will guide visitors to experience art through active looking at selected highlights of the collections. These general tours provide a good introduction to the collection and to strategies for looking at art through lively and engaging conversation.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, October 14, 2 pm - 3 pm

Benjamin West's iconic painting The Death of General Wolfe (1776) depicts the death of the British commander at the 1759 Battle of Quebec during what in this country is known as the French and Indian War. West’s painting of a contemporary event in the conventions of an academic history painting became one of the most celebrated in Britain. Docents will illuminate this pivotal moment in art history.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

October 17

Benjamin West: General Wolfe and the Art of Empire

Wednesday, October 17, 4 pm - 8 pm
Galleries
Advance registration required: umma.umich.edu/education/workshops.html.

The exhibition Benjamin West: General Wolfe and the Art of Empire presents an iconic painting based on historical events from the French and Indian War as well as other supporting documents such as maps and portraits. Local art and social studies educators will find this workshop interesting and valuable. It will feature a gallery talk by curator Carole McNamara, and a hands-on map-making and map-reading component. A light meal, and a file of lesson plans and contextual information will be available to all participants.

Generous support for this exhibition is provided by the Joseph F. McCrindle Foundation, the University of Michigan Health System, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost and Office of the Vice President for Research, the Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, and THE MOSAIC FOUNDATION (of R. & P. Heydon).

categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Special Events



Jazz Series

Wednesday, October 17, 8 pm - 9:30 pm
Forum

Newly appointed UM Assistant Professor of Jazz Trumpet William Lucas has been a member of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra trumpet section since May 1988. Through the years he has performed as a freelance musician in the Detroit/Ann Arbor areas, and served as the Associate Principal Trumpet of the Toledo Symphony prior to his appointment in Detroit. An active member of the freelance, jazz, and chamber music communities in metropolitan Detroit, Professor Lucas has appeared as a jazz soloist in many popular jazz clubs and nightspots of Vail Colorado as well as the Detroit and Montreux, Switzerland Jazz Festivals. A prolific arranger for small ensembles, he is frequently called upon to compose trumpet fanfares for local commemorations. Mr. Lucas’s arrangements for brass have been performed by the symphony orchestras of Phoenix and Detroit, and his arrangements for string instruments have been performed by the Celli Jam, an ensemble comprised of members the Detroit Symphony Orchestra Cello section. He has been featured as the author of several trumpet pedagogy articles in the International Trumpet Guild's ITG Journal, including his systematic approach to the preparation of orchestral auditioning. Prior to joining the U-M faculty, Mr. Lucas served for three years on the faculty of the Oberlin Conservatory of Music.

Line-up:

Bill Lucas - trumpet
Andrew Bishop - saxphone
Jordan Schug - bass
Sean Dobbins - drums



This monthly series, curated by UM Associate Professor Adam Unsworth, presents outstanding local artists in an intimate setting and is made possible by the Doris Sloan Memorial Fund.

categories: Performing Arts

October 18

Penny W. Stamps Speaker Series

Thursday, October 18, 5:10 pm - 7 pm
Historic Theater, Michigan Theater
603 E. Liberty

Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Events in the Penny Stamps series are always free of charge and open to the public.

Painter Alexis Rockman’s canvases present a darkly surreal vision of the collision between human civilization and the natural world. Drawing from diverse sources that include old master painting, science fiction and natural history, Rockman has also undertaken expeditions into the Amazon Basin, Tasmania, Madagascar, South Africa and Antarctica to research his paintings. He has worked with other artists, and with leading scientists, including paleontologist Peter Ward, naturalist Stephen Jay Gould, and NASA climatologist James Hanson. Rockman’s work is in the collections of LACMA, the Guggenheim and the Whitney Museum of American Art. He was recently the subject of a major retrospective at the Smithsonian Museum of American Art, Alexis Rockman: A Fable for Tomorrow.

With support from Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts Grand Rapids, Chelsea River Gallery.

Established with the generous support of alumna Penny W. Stamps, the Speaker Series brings respected emerging and established artists/designers from a broad spectrum of media to the School to conduct a public lecture and engage with students, faculty, and the larger University and Ann Arbor communities. Additional support is provided by our media sponsor, Michigan Radio.

categories: Artists and Curators, Special Events



Writers Series

Thursday, October 18, 5:10 pm - 6:30 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Clayton Eshleman's poems, critical essays, and translations of poets as important and diverse as César Vallejo, Aimé Césaire, Pablo Neruda, Antonin Artaud, Vladimir Holan, Michel Deguy, Henri Michaux, and Bernard Bador have earned him (and his fellow co-translators in some cases) international acclaim, as testified by a National Book Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, numerous grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities, and two Landon Translation Prizes from the Academy of American Poets. During his career he has published over forty books, including, between 2008 and 2012, three collections of poetry—The Grindstone of Rapport: A Clayton Eshleman Reader, Anticline, and An Anatomy of the Night; and three translations—Curdled Skulls by Bernard Bador, Endure by Bei Dao, with Lucas Klein, and Solar Throat Slashed by Aimé Césaire, with A. James Arnold. In the past decade he has also published three collections of prose—Companion Spider, Archaic Design, and Juniper Fuse: Upper Paleolithic Imagination & the Construction of the Underworld. In 2003 University of California Press published his translation of The Complete Poetry of César Vallejo, on which he spent spent over forty years. In 2012 Black Widow Press will bring out a 400 page compendium of poetry, prose, prose poems, lectures, translations, and journals by Eshleman, spanning 1967 to 2012: The Price of Experience.

The author will be available to sign books after the reading. As always, books will be available for purchase on site.

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Department of English Program in Creative Writing Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell (’64). For more information, please see http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp.

categories: Writers Series

October 19

Ann Arbor Art Center Workshops at UMMA

Friday, October 19, 11:10 am - 1 pm
Galleries
Fridays, September 28–November 16, 2012, 11:10 am–1 pm
Instructor: Heather Accurso
$10 one-time drop-in fee (cash only), materials included Pre-register for all 8 classes: $72 UMMA and AAAC members and UM students / $80 non-members, materials included. Register online at annarborartcenter.org.
Pick up materials at the information desk.

This drop-in gallery class offers an opportunity to be more than an observer at the Museum. With the guidance of the instructor, learn to observe the works in the UMMA collections; experiment with proportion, perspective, line quality, value, composition, and personal style. No experience necessary; all are welcome!

categories: Artmaking



Mark Webster Reading Series

Friday, October 19, 7 pm - 8 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

One MFA student of fiction and one of poetry, each introduced by a peer, will read their work. The Mark Webster Reading Series presents emerging writers in a warm and relaxed setting. We encourage you to bring your friends—a Webster reading makes for an enjoyable and enlightening Friday evening.

categories: UM Student Programs

October 21

Special Event

Sunday, October 21, 12 pm - 4 pm
Rogel Ballroom, Michigan Union
530 S. State Street

Ann Arbor, MI 46801

The Ark is pleased to announce a partnership with the University of Michigan's student organization New Beat Happening, a part of the Center for Campus Involvement.

The Ark and New Beat Happening will present Music-Con on Sunday, October 21 from 12 to 4 pm at the Michigan Union. Kicking things off will be keynote speaker Eric Morgeson, of Studio A, from 12 to 12:45 pm, highlighting the major roles involved in the business and sharing personal stories of music in the making. Then students will choose two out of six discussions to attend from 12 to 3 pm, including the following topics: demo listening, songwriting workshop, how to get and promote gigs, open panel discussion with local experts, how to write a contract, and street marketing and social media. Music-Con will wrap up with a trade show from 3 to 4 pm with local music resources, including recording studios, artist management, agents, talent buyers, merchandisers, radio stations ,and more. The trade show promises to be a great networking opportunity and will include live music and some fun swag!

Presented by The Ark, UM Center for Campus Involvement, and New Beat Happening

categories: Special Events



Guided Tour

Sunday, October 21, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA's award-winning docents will guide visitors to experience art through active looking at selected highlights of the collections. These general tours provide a good introduction to the collection and to strategies for looking at art through lively and engaging conversation.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, October 21, 2 pm - 3 pm

African art is often interpreted in Western analytical frameworks as expressions of timeless myths and rituals, interrupted only by the colonial encounter. African Art and the Shape of Time complicates such conventional views by exploring material forms of diverse concepts of temporality, history, and memory. Join UMMA Docents as they discuss the thirty works from UMMA, other museums, and private collections.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Benjamin West: General Wolfe and the Art of Empire
SMTD@UMMA

Sunday, October 21, 7 pm - 9 pm
Apse

Just as Benjamin West's painting The Death of General Wolfe depicts a meeting of Native and European figures, this concert features compositions from the last fifty years that bring together old and new world cultures in music. Bowling Green State University Composition Professor (and UM alumnus) Christopher Dietz conducts his Le Chemin de Salut for soprano and chamber ensemble (featuring Jennifer Goltz, soprano); the Orpheus Singers perform Ariel Ramirez’s celebrated Misa Criolla alongside choral selections by fellow Argentinian composer Carlos Guastavino. 

The SMTD@UMMA performance series is made possible in part by the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund. Generous support for this exhibition is provided by the Joseph F. McCrindle Foundation, the University of Michigan Health System, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost and Office of the Vice President for Research, the Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, and THE MOSAIC FOUNDATION (of R. & P. Heydon).

categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Performing Arts

October 25

Writers Series

Thursday, October 25, 5:10 pm - 6:45 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Daniel Woodrell has been called one of the best kept secrets in American literature and is the author of eight books including Tomato Red, which won the 1999 PEN Center USA award for fiction, Woe to Live On, which was adapted into a movie by Ang Lee, and Winter’s Bone, recently adapted into an Oscar-nominated film of the same name. He recently published his first collection of short fiction, The Outlaw Album, twelve new, timeless tales of those on the fringes of society. Five of Daniel Woodrell's eight published novels were selected as New York Times Notable Books of the Year. Woodrell lives in the Ozarks near the Arkansas line with his wife, Katie Estill.

Katie Estill is a graduate of Kenyon College and has an MFA degree from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. She lived in Greece for five years and has worked as a teacher, journalist, and head of a county task force on violence against women. She is the author of two novels: Evening Would Find Me, published by Joyce Carol Oates’ Ontario Review Press, and Dahlia’s Gone, St. Martin’s Press, which was a finalist for the Dashiell Hammett Prize. Her short stories have appeared in such journals as The Missouri Review, Mid-American Review, Ontario Review, Elder Mountain, and the anthology, Surreal South. She lives in the Ozarks with her husband, Daniel Woodrell.

The authors will be available to sign books after the reading. As always, books will be available for purchase on site.

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Department of English Program in Creative Writing Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell (’64). For more information, please see http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp.

categories: Writers Series



Penny W. Stamps Speaker Series

Thursday, October 25, 5:10 pm - 7 pm
Historic Theater, Michigan Theater
603 E. Liberty

Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Events in the Penny Stamps series are always free of charge and open to the public.

One of the most controversial directors in Hollywood, Oliver Stone has made films that are remarkable for both the way in which their subject matter is handled and the degree of controversy such handling inspires. A producer, screenwriter, and actor on a variety of films, Stone is consistently identified with his more political works, including Platoon, and Nixon. Despite this association with political films, Stone has stated that he considers his films "first and foremost to be dramas about individuals in personal struggles," and that he believes himself to be a dramatist rather than a political filmmaker. Stone has received Academy Awards for Midnight Express (1978), Platoon (1986) and Born on the Fourth of July (1989), and his directed films have been nominated for 31 Academy Awards. Stone’s most recent project, "The Untold History of the United States," is a 10-part documentary series focusing on under-reported events that crucially shaped the last 60 years of America's history. Narrated, co-written, and directed by Stone, the series debunks some of America's heroes by restating the facts, while crediting some heroes previously lost to history.

With support from UM Screen Arts& Cultures, Ann Arbor Film Festival.

Established with the generous support of alumna Penny W. Stamps, the Speaker Series brings respected emerging and established artists/designers from a broad spectrum of media to the School to conduct a public lecture and engage with students, faculty, and the larger University and Ann Arbor communities. Additional support is provided by our media sponsor, Michigan Radio.

categories: Artists and Curators, Film, Special Events

October 26

Ann Arbor Art Center Workshops at UMMA

Friday, October 26, 11:10 am - 1 pm
Galleries
Fridays, September 28–November 16, 2012, 11:10 am–1 pm
Instructor: Heather Accurso $10 one-time drop-in fee (cash only), materials included Pre-register for all 8 classes: $72 UMMA and AAAC members and UM students / $80 non-members, materials included. Register online at annarborartcenter.org.
Pick up materials at the information desk.

This drop-in gallery class offers an opportunity to be more than an observer at the Museum. With the guidance of the instructor, learn to observe the works in the UMMA collections; experiment with proportion, perspective, line quality, value, composition, and personal style. No experience necessary; all are welcome!

categories: Artmaking



Guided Tour

Friday, October 26, 12:15 pm - 12:45 pm

Designed specifically for the lunch hour, UMMA staff will offer 30 minutes of conversation about art in the UMMA galleries around fresh and entertaining themes such as inspiration, love, heroes, and more. Meet at the Information Desk.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

October 27

Special Event

Saturday, October 27, 9:30 am - 5 pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

This year’s symposium, From Bodies to Billboards: Alternative Sites of Display, seeks to build upon recent developments in curatorial practices and museum theory by focusing attention on alternative sites and modes of display. One of the goals of this symposium is to consider critically how meaning is generated from specific sites, and how context changes our understanding of the work of art. “Alternative” is viewed as an open category that might embrace unusual or overlooked spaces and display practices, or encourage new, critical approaches to traditional exhibition arenas (galleries, museums, etc.). Another goal is to spur interdisciplinary dialogue, intellectual debate, and to broaden the community of art historians and other scholars working with visual material and culture beyond the walls of the University of Michigan.

This event is sponsored by the University of Michigan Department of the History of Art, UMMA, and the Institute for the Humanities. Speaker details are posted on the History of Art website www.lsa.umich.edu/histart.

categories: Special Events



Guided Tour

Saturday, October 27, 11:15 am - 12:15 pm

Children ages four to seven are invited to hear a story in the galleries. Student docents and UMMA staff will bring art to life as they read stories related to the art on display and invite responses from our youngest patrons. Each story is followed by a short art activity. Parents must accompany children. Siblings are welcome to join the group. Meet at the Information Desk.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

October 28

Guided Tour

Sunday, October 28, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA's award-winning docents will guide visitors to experience art through active looking at selected highlights of the collections. These general tours provide a good introduction to the collection and to strategies for looking at art through lively and engaging conversation.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, October 28, 2 pm - 3 pm

Benjamin West's iconic painting The Death of General Wolfe (1776) depicts the death of the British commander at the 1759 Battle of Quebec during what in this country is known as the French and Indian War. West’s painting of a contemporary event in the conventions of an academic history painting became one of the most celebrated in Britain. Docents will illuminate this pivotal moment in art history.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

October 29

Writers Series

Monday, October 29, 6:10 pm - 8 pm
Forum
Apse

David Mitchell is the acclaimed author of the novels Cloud Atlas, which was a Man Booker Prize finalist and which was recently made into a major motion picture starring Tom Hanks; Black Swan Green, which was selected as one of the 10 Best Books of the Year by Time; Number9Dream, which was short-listed for the Man Booker as well as the James Tait Black Memorial Prize; Ghostwritten, awarded the Mail on Sunday/John Llewellyn Rhys Prize for best book by a writer under thirty-five and short-listed for the Guardian First Book Award; and most recently, The Thousand Autums of Jacob de Zoet. He lives in Ireland.

As always, books will be available for purchase on site.

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Department of English Program in Creative Writing Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell (’64). For more information, please see http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp.

categories: Writers Series