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Programs and Tours

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November 1

Guided Tour

Saturday, November 1, 11:15 am - 12:15 pm

Children ages four to seven are invited to hear a story in the galleries. Student docents and UMMA staff will bring art to life as they read stories related to the art on display and invite responses from our youngest patrons. The November 1st Storytime will  happen in the bold and colorful exhibition Reductive Minimalism: Women Artists in Dialogue, 1960-2014. Each story is followed by a short art activity. Parents must accompany children. Siblings are welcome to join the group.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

November 2

Guided Tour

Sunday, November 2, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent's approach and choice of objects is unique.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, November 2, 2 pm - 3 pm

Nearly fifty years after its heyday, Minimalism is enjoying a resurgence of critical attention, though much of the focus continues to be on male artists or on a small number of women sculptors. Reductive Minimalism: Women Artists in Dialogue, 1960-2014 offers a fresh perspective on the movement and its evolution, bringing together formative works from two generations of painters to examine and celebrate the dialogue between them. As opposed to male practitioners who favored oversized works with grandiose themes, women Minimalists took a more restrained or reductive approach, one more intimate in scale, more personal in narrative. Join UMMA docents as they explore this take on the Minimalist heritage.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Detroit before the Automobile: The William L. Clements Library Collection

Sunday, November 2, 3 pm - 4 pm

The Jan and David Brandon Family Bridge

This collaborative exhibition draws on the extensive collection of materials related to Detroit history at the William L. Clements Library to present the story of the Motor City before the arrival of the auto industry. Join Clements Library curators Brian Leigh Dunnigan and Clayton Lewis as they discuss the history of Detroit from its beginnings as a French outpost to its emergence as a manufacturing powerhouse at the end of the nineteenth century. The exhibition includes a fascinating array of maps, letters, prints, and photographs that reveal Detroit’s early history in vivid detail.

This program is free and open to the public, but space is limited. Please register to secure your place by emailing umma-program-registration@umich.edu.

The exhibition is part of the U-M Collections Collaborations series, co-organized by and presented at UMMA and designed to showcase the renowned and diverse collections at the University of Michigan. 

The U-M Collections Collaborations series is generously supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

categories: Artists and Curators, Exhibitions Related Program

November 4



Tuesday, November 4, 7 pm - 8:30 pm

Helmut Stern Auditorium

This documentary (58 min, dir. Nycander, 2009) is a portrayal of Inta Ruka, one of Europe’s most noteworthy documentary photographers, who despite her renown, still works as a cleaner at the Swedish embassy in Riga. For thirty years she has taken hauntingly beautiful portraits of the faces of Latvia, images that depict a country in the throes of dramatic change.

From 1984 to 2000, Ruka photographed primarily in the rural area of Balvi and, later on, increasingly in the capital of Riga. In the series People I happened to meet, she strikes up conversations with unknown people in order to ask them for a portrait. In Amalia's Street 5, she focused on the inhabitants of an apartment complex in Riga. Her photographs have been shown at the 48th Biennale of Venice, the Photography Centre in Istanbul  and the Barbican Arts Centre in London.

The screening will be followed by Q & A with the filmmaker, Maud Nycander, and artist Inta Ruka.

Inta Ruka is the featured speaker of the Penny W. Stamps Speaker Series on Thursday, November 6 at 5:10 pm at the Michigan Theater in Ann Arbor.




With support from the Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies; the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies; UMMA; and the River Gallery.

categories: Artists and Curators, Film

November 6

Zell Visiting Writers Series

Thursday, November 6, 5:10 pm - 6:10 pm

Helmut Stern Auditorium

 
Michael Paterniti is the author of the New York Times bestselling books, The Telling Room: A Tale of Love, Betrayal, Revenge, and the World's Greatest Cheese and Driving Mr. Albert: A Trip Across America with Einstein’s Brain, which has been published in 20 countries. His writing has appeared in varied publications including The New York Times Magazine, National Geographic, Harper’s, Rolling Stone, Esquire, and GQ, where he is a correspondent. In addition, he’s been a frequent contributor to the radio show, This American Life, and his work has been heard on the BBC and CBC. He’s the winner of an NEA grant and National Magazine Award. His forthcoming collection of essays, Love and Other Ways of Dying, will be published in spring of 2015. He lives in Portland, Maine, with his wife, the writer Sara Corbett, and their three children.
 
Sara Corbett has worked as a contributing writer to The New York Times Magazine since 2001, writing about everything from the plight of Sudanese refugees in the U.S., to child-trafficking in Cambodia, and the life and times of world’s best 12-year-old baseball pitcher. Her reporting on the impact of industrial chemicals on an American family earned a “Front Page” award from the Newswoman’s Club of New York, and she was nominated for National Magazine Award for feature writing for her story on Carl Jung’s secret “Red Book.” She co-authored the New York Times bestselling, A House in the Sky (Scribner, 2013), which was named one of Amazon’s top-ten books of 2013 and a New York Times notable book.


UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell(’64). For more information, please see www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp.

categories: Writers Series





Thursday, November 6, 7 pm - 9 pm

Museum Apse

Few musicians are as versatile as trumpeter Bill Lucas, equally at home in Jazz (as Professor of Jazz Trumpet) and classical music (as a performer with the Detroit Symphony). For this year’s SMTD@UMMA series, Lucas performs selections from his new CD On the Fringe of Fire, bringing Gershwin tunes to life with both a Jazz combo and a brass quintet.

The SMTD@UMMA performance series is made possible in part by the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund.



categories: Performing Arts





Thursday, November 6, 7 pm - 8 pm

Helmut Stern Auditorium

David Howes, Professor of Anthropology and the Director of the Concordia Centre for Sensory Studies at Concordia University, Montreal, will explore sensory engagement in museums over time.

In the modern museum, visitors are normally expected to check their senses (along with their overcoats and bags) at the entrance – all except for sight. What if we were to let the senses free in the museum?

Until quite recently, most scholars and curators have tended to think of the museum as a site of pure spectatorship, with objects in glass cases and visitors warned to keep their hands off. While this situation was generally true of twentieth-century museums, research into the sensory history of the early museum has uncovered a different scenario. The first museums of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were hands-on sites in which visitors expected and were permitted to handle artifacts, and sometimes even chew them. This presentation will trace the transformation in museum etiquette which turned visitors from handlers into spectators. It will then leap ahead to explore (and evaluate) how, in quite a few twenty-first century museums, the senses are making a comeback.

Didactic instruction has increasingly come to be supplemented by multimodal approaches to learning, disinterested contemplation has been offset by affective participation, and the authority to interpret objects has been redistributed (e.g. indigenous communities now challenge the privileged status and access to artifacts of the all-knowing curator, artists who create “relational art”). From a site for “single sense epiphanies” the museum, in at least some cases, is becoming a kind of sensory gymnasium. What can museum studies scholars learn from studying public reaction to these breaking developments? How far will the sensory turn in contemporary museology be allowed to go?

David Howes is Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Centre for Sensory Studies at Concordia University, Montreal. He has carried out field research in Papua New Guinea, Northwestern Argentina and the Southwestern United States. His research interests include sensory anthropology, the consumer society, and the anthropology of law. His publications include Ways of Sensing: Understanding the Senses in Society (with Constance Classen) and the edited collection A Cultural History of the Senses in the Modern Age, 1920-2000.

For further details on his publications and research activities see www.david.howes.com

categories:

November 7

Mark Webster Reading Series
Student Programs

Friday, November 7, 7 pm - 8 pm

Helmut Stern Auditorium

One MFA student of fiction and one of poetry, each introduced by a peer, will read their work. The Mark Webster Reading Series presents emerging writers in a warm and relaxed setting. We encourage you to bring your friends - a Webster reading makes for an enjoyable and enlightening Friday evening.

categories: UM Student Programs, Writers Series

November 9

Guided Tour

Sunday, November 9, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent's approach and choice of objects is unique.


categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, November 9, 2 pm - 3 pm

Multipurpose Room

Drawn from the extensive holdings of the William L. Clements Library at the University of Michigan (U-M), this exhibition illustrates the rich history of the city of Detroit through maps, letters, prints, and photographs. From its beginnings as a French outpost to its emergence as a manufacturing powerhouse, the exhibition will focus on the city's growth,  its people, and its legacy. In addition to the riches in this exhibition, docents will explore connections to Detroit found in the permanent collections.


categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

November 11

Student Programs

Tuesday, November 11, 6 pm - 7:30 pm

Forum
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Hip Hop Congress will be partnering with arts­intensive student organization, Fighting Obstacles Knowing Ultimate Success (F.O.K.U.S.), to bring Bronx rapper and community activist YC the Cynic to the University of Michigan Museum of Art (UMMA) on November 11 from 6­7:30 PM to perform and do a Q&A on the intersection between activism and music. He is a founding member of the Rebel Diaz Arts Collective (RDACBX), "a hip hop community center that utilizes all five elements [of hip hop] to spread their message about the injustices faced by oppressed groups while providing a safe haven for young people to perform and learn." At RDACBX, he works with youth on hip hop related arts projects and organizes members of his community to make positive changes. He recently traveled to Ferguson to show solidarity with the activists and had the opportunity to speak and eat with the family of Mike Brown. In addition to his social justice work, YC the Cynic released his album GNK last year to overwhelmingly positive reviews. The album showcases his talent as an MC and his lyrics question various social forces at work in our communities.
The event will begin in Helmut Stern Auditorium at UMMA, where Lloyd Shelton will lead a moderated discussion between YC and the audience. Lloyd is Master of Social Work student at the University of Michigan School of Social Work, where he conducts research on the expressions of masculinity in hip hop. Lloyd will help guide a 20­25 minute conversation with YC about YC’s work in the community and how it influences his music. This conversation will begin with a focus on the historical tradition of resistance and community building within hip hop culture. We will emphasize the diversity of the five elements (emceeing, deejaying, bboying, graffiti, and knowledge) and the ways in which they touch a wide range of social issues that spans and connects different communities. We will then discuss how YC’s participation in this rich tradition influences his rapping and and how art can be used as a tool to improve our communities. We will then open the floor for 15­20 minutes of questions, when audience members can interact directly with YC. After the Q&A, we will have a 10 minute break as we progress to the Forum room in UMMA. In the Forum room, YC will perform his music for approximately 30 minutes, standing in the same room as the audience.
As a community organizer, youth educator and hip hop artist, YC the Cynic provides extremely relevant experience and insights on the intersection between art and politics. The Q&A presents an opportunity for students to learn about the way that art can be used as a tool for resistance and positive change in our community. YC will be able to present relevant reflections on the role art has to play in social movements and social work. By partnering with UMMA and F.O.K.U.S. we hope to reach a wide community audience, encourage involvement in social justice organizations on campus and provide a space for artists and activists to connect and learn from each other.

categories: UM Student Programs

November 13

Zell Visiting Writers Series

Thursday, November 13, 5:10 pm - 6:10 pm

Helmut Stern Auditorium

Catherine Barnett is the author of two collections of poetry: Into Perfect Spheres Such Holes Are Pierced and The Game of Boxes, which was the recipient of the 2012 James Laughlin Award from the Academy of American Poets. Her awards and honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Whiting Writers’ Award. She also works as an independent editor and as Writer-in-Residence at the Children’s Museum of Manhattan where she teaches writing to mothers in the shelter system. Barnett has been the Visiting Poet at Barnard College and teaches at the New School and New York University. 


UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell(’64). For more information, please see www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp.

categories: Writers Series

November 16

Guided Tour

Sunday, November 16, 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
To register for this free program, email umma-program-registration@umich.edu or call 734.647.0522 for more information.

If you or someone you care about is experiencing mild memory loss, join UMMA’s knowledgeable docents on Sunday, November 16th to enjoy looking at and responding to works from UMMA’s collection. This program is designed for people who live at home and their companions.

November's event will explore highlights from the Museum's collection, beloved favorites as well as newer, exciting works. The tour will be informal and interactive, using music as well as discussion to prompt thoughts.

Meet by the Museum Store inside the Frankel Family Wing.

We hope you can join us.

Save the date for upcoming Meet Me sessions:
Sunday, May 5th
Sunday, July 12th

Meet Me at UMMA is generously supported by individual donors, and as part of the Museum’s Docent Program, it is made possible in part by the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund and the Doris Sloan Memorial Fund.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, November 16, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent's approach and choice of objects is unique.


categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, November 16, 2 pm - 3 pm

Each of the works in Suspended Moments: Photographs from the David S. Rosen Collection offer insights into an interior world. Dr. David S. Rosen was a pediatrician with a specialization in adolescent medicine. This exhibition features photographs from his collection that reflect his professional practice, notably, children at various stages, particularly those difficult years that chart the transition from childhood to adulthood. Docents will introduce this exhibition and link them to images of childhood in UMMA’s permanent collection.


categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Reductive Minimalism: Women Artists in Dialogue, 1960—2014

Sunday, November 16, 3 pm - 4:30 pm

A. Alfred Taubman Gallery I
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Reductive Minimalism: Women Artists in Dialogue, 1960-2014 offers a fresh perspective on Minimalism and its evolution, paying particular attention to the approaches and artistic practices of two generations of women Minimalist painters. Please join exhibition curator Erica Barrish and Alison Gass, Associate Director for Exhibitions, Collections, and Curatorial Affairs at the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University, for an exploration of the impact of the first generation of women painters on the current discourse and practices of women painters working today.

Erica Barrish has been actively engaged in the global art community since 1995. She has worked as a critic, curator, writer and art advisor. Recently, she is the Director of Sales for Marianne Boesky Gallery in New York, a leading Contemporary Art Gallery. Previously, she spent 8 years as a Contemporary Art Specialist for Christie’s, Wright and Sotheby’s. Earlier she worked as an appraiser and art advisor for Appraisal Resource Associates. She has worked on curatorial projects with the Whitney Museum of American Art, The Smithsonian Institute for Traveling Exhibitions, The Detroit Institute of Arts and the Guggenheim Museum. She has her Bachelors in Fine Art from the University of Michigan and her Masters in Art History from Hunter College. She teaches art and business at Sotheby’s Institute in New York. She is also a member of the American Society of Appraisers and Arttable. 

Alison Gass is Associate Director for Exhibitions, Collections, and Curatorial Affairs at the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University. Prior to this position, she was Curator of Contemporary Art and Deputy Director at the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University.  There she was responsible for developing exhibitions and commissions of international scope. Gass was named a young curator to watch by The New York Times in 2010. As assistant curator of painting and sculpture at SFMOMA, Gass organized exhibitions for the museum’s “New Work Series,” which showcases emerging and midcareer artists, most recently with Tiago Carneiro Da Cunha, Klara Kristalova and Mika Rottenberg. Prior to joining SFMOMA, Gass worked at the Jewish Museum in New York, The Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum and The Museum of Modern Art, New York. She has published and lectured on diverse aspects of contemporary art, and holds degrees in Art History from both Columbia University and the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University.

Lead support for the exhibition Reductive Minimalism: Women Artists in Dialogue, 1960-2014 is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, the University of Michigan Health System, and the Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund. Additional generous support is provided by the Susan and Richard Gutow Fund, Elaine Pitt, the University of Michigan CEW Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Fund and Department of the History of Art, the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund, and the Doris Sloan Memorial Fund.

categories: Artists and Curators, Exhibitions Related Program, Gallery Talks and Tours

November 18

Zell Visiting Writers Series

Tuesday, November 18, 5:10 pm - 6:30 pm

Helmut Stern Auditorium

David Bezmozgis is an award-winning writer and filmmaker whose fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, Harper’s Magazine, Zoetrope: All-Story, and The Best American Short Stories. He was named one of the New Yorker's “20 Under 40” writers in 2010. He lives in Toronto.

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell(’64). For more information, please see www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp.

categories: Writers Series

November 19



Wednesday, November 19, 5 pm - 6 pm

Multipurpose Room

Park Su-geun, one of South Korea’s most beloved painters of the 20th century, is known as much for the development of his textured, rock-like painted surfaces as he is for his subject matter: rural Korean men, women, and children.  This lecture by Christine Hahn, Associate Professor of Art History at Kalamazoo College, traces Park's career between 1940 and his death in 1965, focusing on several interrelated factors that influenced Park's work including his relationship with Western audiences and patrons through the newly formed Bando Gallery in Seoul; his fascination with the French Barbizon painter, Jean-Francois Millet; and his enduring interest in early Korean history and archaeology.

Hahn's lecture, presented in collaboration with U-M's Nam Center for Korean Studies, celebrates UMMA's recent acquisition of Park's work People on the Street, a gift from the family of the late Joseph T. A. Lee, who taught in the U-M College of Architecture and Urban Planning for over three decades.

Light refreshments and the opportunity to see the work will follow Hahn's remarks.

Christine Y. Hahn is Associate Professor of Art History at Kalamazoo College.  Her interest in the painter Park Su-geun evolved out of her doctoral work at the University of Chicago, which examined the development of modern Korean racial, ethnic, and national identity through the vehicle of painters, exhibitions, and the art museum during the mid-20th century.  This work has been supported by the Fulbright and the National Endowment for the Humanities and has been published in the Journal of Visual Resources as well as in a forthcoming issue of positions: Asia critique.

categories: Collections Related, Special Events

November 21

Mark Webster Reading Series
Student Programs

Friday, November 21, 7 pm - 8 pm

Helmut Stern Auditorium

One MFA student of fiction and one of poetry, each introduced by a peer, will read their work. The Mark Webster Reading Series presents emerging writers in a warm and relaxed setting. We encourage you to bring your friends - a Webster reading makes for an enjoyable and enlightening Friday evening.

categories: UM Student Programs, Writers Series

November 22

Reductive Minimalism: Women Artists in Dialogue, 1960—2014

Saturday, November 22, 7 pm - 9 pm

A. Alfred Taubman Gallery I
Museum Apse

UMMA’s exhibition of women Minimalist painters celebrates the exchange of ideas between two generations of artists. Newly appointed U-M Jazz piano professor Benny Green makes his UMMA debut with an exploration of his musical lineage. This performance will be a dialogue with the past, the present, and the future of Jazz.

Lead support for the exhibition Reductive Minimalism: Women Artists in Dialogue, 1960-2014 is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, the University of Michigan Health System, and the Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund. Additional generous support is provided by the Susan and Richard Gutow Fund, Elaine Pitt, the University of Michigan CEW Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Fund and Department of the History of Art, the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund, and the Doris Sloan Memorial Fund.

The SMTD@UMMA performance series is made possible in part by the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Performing Arts

November 23

Guided Tour

Sunday, November 23, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent's approach and choice of objects is unique.


categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, November 23, 2 pm - 3 pm

Fred Tomaselli’s works rearrange realities, commingling elements of reality and surreality. His work draws on a wide range of sources. This exhibition will be comprised primarily of Tomaselli’s New York Times collages begun in 2005, which alter the front pages of that daily newspaper. His manipulation of the cover page image through his application of collage, gouache, and watercolor, sets up a striking contrast between the somber detachment of journalistic language that surrounds them. The results are sometimes funny, sometimes sinister, and often both.


categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

November 30

Guided Tour

Sunday, November 30, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent's approach and choice of objects is unique.


categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, November 30, 2 pm - 3 pm

Drawn from the extensive holdings of the William L. Clements Library at the University of Michigan (U-M), this exhibition illustrates the rich history of the city of Detroit through maps, letters, prints, and photographs. From its beginnings as a French outpost to its emergence as a manufacturing powerhouse, the exhibition will focus on the city's growth,  its people, and its legacy. In addition to the riches in this exhibition, docents will explore connections to Detroit found in the permanent collections.


categories: Gallery Talks and Tours