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February 5

Mark Webster Reading Series

Friday, February 5, 7–8 p.m.

Helmut Stern Auditorium
Free and open to the public.  Seating is first come, first serve. 

One MFA student of fiction and one of poetry, each introduced by a peer, will read their work. The Mark Webster Reading Series presents emerging writers in a warm and relaxed setting. We encourage you to bring your friends - a Webster reading makes for an enjoyable and enlightening Friday evening.

categories: UM Student Programs, Writers Series

February 6



Saturday, February 6, 11:15 a.m.–12 p.m.

UMMA Store

Children ages four to seven are invited to hear a story in the galleries. Stories will be followed by a short activity responding to the art on display. Parents must accompany children. Siblings are welcome to join the group. Meet in front of the UMMA Store.

Storytime is generously supported by the University of Michigan Credit Union, UMMA's Lead Sponsor for Student and Family Engagement. 


categories: Family, Gallery Talks and Tours



Soviet Constructivist Posters: Branding the New Order

Saturday, February 6, 4:30–7:40 p.m.

Helmut Stern Auditorium
Free and open to the public.  Seating is first come, first serve. 

In conjunction with the UMMA exhibition Soviet Constructivist Posters: Branding the New Order, UMMA, the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, and the University of Michigan Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies present a series of groundbreaking films from the early Soviet Union. The bold designs of the movie posters in the exhibition announced to the public the new revolutionary state in its formative first decade, the 1920's.  The movies themselves are still viewed and studied today for their inventive approach to filmmaking. Five of the films advertised by the posters will be screened in February. The final day of the series, February 12, 2016, also features a panel discussion of the Constructivist movement with exhibition curator Lehti Keelmann and U-M faculty.

Schedule of Films for February 6:
4:30pm- October/Ten Days that Shook the World, Sergei Eisenstein, 1928 (103 minutes)
October re-enacts the beginning of the October Revolution, with its iconic moments such as the storming of the Winter Palace.  It is directed by Soviet cinematic great, Sergei Eisenstein (from Riga, Latvia), who participated in the revolution, producing propaganda.  The film is dynamic and some of its elements such as the use of banners are visually translated into the accompanying poster.  It is significant for its historical context in recounting (through the eyes of the Bolsheviks) the events of the revolution at an early point in  the trajectory of the Soviet Union.  Though prepared earlier, the film was not released until 1928 due to Stalin's ban on images of Leonid Trotsky, which required certain scenes to be edited out.  

For Eisenstein, camera angles and the minutea of detail were important.  He cultivated a style involving a "montage of attraction," which brought together different theatrical techniques and types of scenes for a composite effect.  He used actors and scripts and sought to build intensity from scene to scene.  While foreign critics praised his inventive camera angles and montages, they were skeptically received in the Soviet Union, especially after Eisenstein's blockbuster success, The Battleship Potemkin. 

6:30pm- Zvenigora, Aleksandr Dovženko, Georgi Astafyev, and Vja?eslaw Ov?innikov, 1927 (67 minutes)

Zvenigora combines the tradition of Ukrainian folk tales and poetry with revolutionary ideals and dynamic cinematic practices in early Soviet film.  Directed by Ukrainian Alexander Dovženko, the film centers on a hidden treasure in the Ukrainian region of Zvenigora and juxtaposes the past with the present. A grandfather tells the story of the hidden treasure to his two grandsons, who react in different ways. The first, Pavlo, searches for the treasure, becomes a con artist, and eventually commits suicide.  The second, Tymishko, becomes a soldier of the revolution (fighting for the Bolsheviks in the Ukrainian Civil War) and discovers that the true treasure of Zvenigora involves working the land to reveal the bounty of agriculture and industry.

For Dovženko, the revolution was about understanding how to harness the land for progress. In this vein, the landscape plays an important role in the film. While the film was criticized for being too nationalistic, Dovženko believed that it highlighted the range of his creative abilities and espoused Eisenstein’s “montage of attractions.” The film mediates traditions and national history – the mythical – with a narrative of the New Order – the modern. Produced by VUFKU, Zvenigora is part of a trilogy of silent films centered on Ukraine by Dovženko that also include Arsenal and Earth.

Series Schedule:
All programs take place in the Helmut Stern Auditorium.
 
Saturday, February 6:
4:30 pm – October/Ten Days that Shook the World, Sergei Eisenstein, 1928 (103 minutes)
6:30 pm – Zvenigora, Aleksandr Dovženko, Georgi Astafyev, and Vja?eslav Ov?innikov, 1927 (67 minutes)
 
Sunday, February 7:
4:30 pm- The Love Triangle/Bed and Sofa, Abram Room, 1927 (87 minutes)
6:15 pm- The Eleventh, Dziga Vertov, 1928 (52 minutes)
 
Friday, February 12:
4:30 pm – Branding the New Order: Soviet Constructivism, a panel discussion with exhibition curator Lehti Keelmann and U-M faculty
6:30 – The Man with the Movie Camera, Dziga Vertov, 1926 (68 minutes)


Lead support for the exhibition Soviet Constructivist Posters: Branding the New Order and related programs is provided by the University of Michigan Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies and the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies.

Lead support for the exhibition Soviet Constructivist Posters: Branding the New Order is provided by the University of Michigan Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies and the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies.


categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Film

February 7

Guided Tour

Sunday, February 7, 1–2 p.m.

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent's approach and choice of objects is unique. 

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



New Technologies and Victorian Society: Early British Photographs from the UMMA Collection

Sunday, February 7, 3–4 p.m.

Photography Gallery
This program is free and open to the public, but space is limited. Please register to secure your place by emailing umma-program-registration@umich.edu. Please include date and title of program in the subject line of your email.

Journey to 19th century Victorian Britain with exhibition curator Carole McNamara to explore the ways in which early photography captured the themes and interests of the period. While there was heated debate as to whether photography belonged in the sciences as a research aid or whether its pictorial qualities merited its inclusion in the arts, this exhibition focuses on photographs that captured aspects of British society in ways that are poetic and artistic. Themes of the period are reflected in the photographers' interests, including sentimentality about the remote past, an interest in allegory and literature, and social reform in a newly industrialized society. These photographs demonstrate advances in camera speeds and printing techniques which allowed photographers to capture the picturesque ruins, people, and cities of Victorian England.

Lead support for the exhibition New Technologies and Victorian Society: Early British Photographs from the UMMA Collection is provided by the Marvin H. and Mary M. Davidson Endowed Fund.



categories: Artists and Curators



Soviet Constructivist Posters: Branding the New Order

Sunday, February 7, 4:30–7:30 p.m.

Helmut Stern Auditorium
Free and open to the public.  Seating is first come, first serve. 

In conjunction with the UMMA exhibition Soviet Constructivist Posters: Branding the New Order, UMMA, the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, and the University of Michigan Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies present a series of groundbreaking films from the early Soviet Union. The bold designs of the movie posters in the exhibition announced to the public the new revolutionary state in its formative first decade, the 1920's.  The movies themselves are still viewed and studied today for their inventive approach to filmmaking. Five of the films advertised by the posters will be screened in February. The final day of the series, February 12, 2016, also features a panel discussion of the Constructivist movement with exhibition curator Lehti Keelmann and U-M faculty.

Schedule of Films for February 7:
4:30pm- The Love Triangle/Bed and Sofa, Abram Room, 1927 (87 minutes)
The Love Triangle is about the self-determination of the Soviet woman.  Directed by Abram Room (from Vilnius, Lithuania), the film tells the story of a husband and wife living in a small basement apartment in Moscow in the early days of the Soviet Union. The husband’s friend comes to town looking for work and stays with the couple. Eventually, the wife, who spends her days at home preparing meals and gazing out from the apartment windows, and the guest begin an affair. Even after the affair comes to light, the three characters are forced to live together due to the housing shortage crisis. Therein begins a ménage-a-trois. The film critiques the bourgeois lifestyle and traditional values and juxtaposes them with the ideas of the New Order. When the wife becomes pregnant and neither man assumes responsibility, she leaves (and does not get an abortion as suggested by the men) and embarks on her own life as a self-sufficient member of the new society, free from the relics of the past.

The film illustrates important developments in the Soviet Union regarding gender roles and the rejection of old values. It depicts day-to-day life in the early days, including the burden of housework, which is contrasted to the visionary ideas of the New Order that advocated for communal kitchens and daycares to enable women to join the workforce. The film was originally titled “Third Meshchanskaia,” referring to the apartment’s address, with Meshchanstvo meaning “bourgeois.” This association explicitly calls attention to the film’s critical angle. Unlike Eisenstein, who preferred to emphasize the collective over  specific character in his films, Room wanted to highlight the development of individuals, which is reflected in the film’s poster.

6:15pm- The Eleventh, Dziga Vertov, 1928 (52 minutes)
The Eleventh documents the industrialization of the Soviet Union for the occasion of the New Order’s 11th anniversary. The film primarily focuses on the harnessing of nature by humans and technology for development. One such focus is the Dnepr Hydroelectric Plant in Ukraine, which is montaged with scenes of people at work, as well as other industries. Vertov sought to combine experimental methods with socialist visual language. The result, where man harnesses machine, follows in the vein of his concept of the Kino-Eye. The film is significant in its celebratory visualization of progress and development through the eyes of the “everyday man,” but in a manner that is visually dynamic, reflecting the first ten years of the Soviet experiment – a time of radical change.

Series Schedule:
All programs take place in the Helmut Stern Auditorium.

Saturday, February 6: 
4:30 pm – October/Ten Days that Shook the World, Sergei Eisenstein, 1928 (103 minutes)
6:30 pm – Zvenigora, Aleksandr – Zvenigora, Aleksandr Dovženko, Georgi Astafyev, and Vja?eslav Ov?innikov, 1927 (67 minutes)

Sunday, February 7: 
4:30 pm- The Love Triangle/Bed and Sofa, Abram Room, 1927 (87 minutes)
6:15 pm- The Eleventh, Dziga Vertov, 1928 (52 minutes)

Friday, February 12:
4:30 pm – Branding the New Order: Soviet Constructivism, a panel discussion with exhibition curator Lehti Keelmann and U-M faculty.
6:30 – The Man with the Movie Camera, Dziga Vertov, 1926 (68 minutes)




Lead support for the exhibition Soviet Constructivist Posters: Branding the New Order and related programs is provided by the University of Michigan Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies and the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies.

Lead support for the exhibition Soviet Constructivist Posters: Branding the New Order is provided by the University of Michigan Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies and the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies.


categories:

February 10



Wednesday, February 10, 6–9:30 p.m.

Forum
Helmut Stern Auditorium

ENGAGE AND BE HEARD.
SHARE YOUR WORK.
CONNECT WITH OTHERS.


A gathering of students to bring different groups together on campus who are interested in leadership, diversity, and the arts. The program will include dynamic, short presentations and opportunities for networking, discussion, and building an audience with other students on campus, as well as connecting with potential partners and collaborators.

Hosted by the UMMA Student Engagement Council, which serves as a direct link between U-M students and the Art Museum. It is dedicated to helping support UMMA's mission of commitment to students and engagement with the arts.

Presenters include:
Helicon
is the University of Michigan history of art undergraduate student organization dedicated to supporting the artistic culture at the University of Michigan.

Hip Hop Congress promote hip hop culture on campus and in the community through events including panels, speeches, concerts, and various other creative methods to showcase hip hop history and culture, as well as the social and political issues hip hop addresses.

Michigan in Color is a section of the Michigan Daily that focuses on highlighting and prioritizing a space for the experiences of people of color at the University of Michigan.

Middle East and Arab Network (MEdAN) seeks to combat false misconceptions by educating the public, and to foster and sustain a sense of community and solidarity among Arab, Middle Eastern, and North African students, as well as between the different communities throughout the university.

Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs (MESA)’s mission is “To promote student development and empower the campus community around issues of diversity and social justice through the lens of race and ethnicity.” They provide support to all students through programming and strive to meet the multicultural needs of students.

The Program on Intergroup Relations (IGR) is a social justice education program that blends theory and experiential learning to facilitate students' learning about social group identity, social inequality, and intergroup relations.

SHEI Magazine is the University of Michigan's premiere fashion, art, and culture magazine and an organization that offers students hands-on experience in all matters editorial and business.

Spectrum Center envisions an inclusive campus community free of discrimination in all forms where social justice inspires community engagement and equity. With sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression as a framework, the Spectrum Center is committed to enriching the campus experience and developing students as individuals and as members of communities.

WCBN (88.3 FM) is the University of Michigan student-run community freeform radio station in Ann Arbor, Michigan. With an emphasis on alternative broadcasting and exposing their listenership to things they can't hear on other radio stations.

The Intergroup Relations Council of the Michigan Community Scholars Program works to promote diversity and intercultural understanding throughout our community and the University of Michigan campus.

Special alumnae guests:
Ash Arder is an artist and researcher currently based in Detroit. She creates installations and sculptural objects using a combination of found and self-made materials. She also works as Cultural Strategist + Producer for Creative Many Michigan, an nonprofit focused on developing creative people, creative places and creative economies for a competitive Michigan.

Alma Davila-Toro currently works as Event Manager & Director of Championships for the U of M Athletic Department. She is also Co-Founder & Faculty Advisor of FOKUS (Fighting Obstacles Knowing Ultimate Success).


FREE! ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND!! THERE WILL BE FOOD!!!

Click here to RSVP and invite your friends on Facebook.


Co-sponsored by Arts @ Michigan

categories: UM Student Programs

February 11



Thursday, February 11, 5:30–6:30 p.m.

Helmut Stern Auditorium

NoViolet Bulawayo won the 2014 PEN-Hemingway Award, the 2011 Caine Prize for African Writing, and the inaugural Etisalat Prize for Literature in 2014. We Need New Names was a finalist for numerous other awards, including the Man Booker Prize. NoViolet earned her MFA at Cornell University where she was a recipient of the Truman Capote Fellowship. She was a Stegner Fellow at Stanford University, where she now teaches as a Jones Lecturer in Fiction. NoViolet grew up in Zimbabwe.

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from U-M alumna Helen Zell (’64). For more information, please see
lsa.umich.edu/writers/readingsevents/zellvisitingwritersseries
 






categories:

February 12

Soviet Constructivist Posters: Branding the New Order

Friday, February 12, 4:30–7:40 p.m.

Helmut Stern Auditorium
Free and open to the public.  Seating is first come, first serve.  

In partnership with the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies and the University of Michigan Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies, UMMA presents a panel discussion about the exhibition Soviet Constructivist Posters: Branding the New Order. This show features a selection of posters for some of early cinema’s most inventive films made during the vibrant and experimental moment of the Soviet Union’s first decade in the 1920's. A screening of The Man with the Movie Camera, consistently ranked as one of the 10 most important documentaries of all times, will follow the panel.

The panelists are Lehti Keelmann, curator of the exhibition and Ph.D. candidate in the History of Art, Herb Eagle, Associate Professor in Slavic Languages and Literatures, Screen Arts and Cultures, CREES, and the Residential College, and Jindrich Toman, Professor in Slavic Languages and Literatures, the Frankel Center for Judaic Studies, and CREES. Participants will provide some introductory remarks followed by a discussion session that includes audience questions. The Man with the Movie Camera, the final and most constructivist of films in the series, begins at 6:30 pm.

During the intermission between panel and film screening, audiences are encouraged to visit the exhibition during UMMA's Fridays After 5 program in which all galleries and the UMMA Store are open until 8 pm

The Man with the Movie Camera (1926, 68 minutes) portrays a day in the life of a Soviet city, serving as a counterpart to the ‘western’ film about 24 hours in Berlin, Symphony of a City (also featured in the exhibition). The film is directed by another Soviet cinematic great, Dziga Vertov (from Poland), whose spontaneous, experimental style is often contrasted to that of Eisenstein. The Man with the Movie Camera illustrates the relationship between mechanical (camera) and human lenses, revealing the artifice of filmmaking itself – the mechanics and labor involved. The film connects to the constructivist ideas about intellectual production and the artist as engineer. It exemplifies the environment at the time where artists were free to experiment with their craft, while producing art that reflected the values of the New Order.

Produced by VUFKU, the Ukrainian State Film Studios, filming took place over the course of four years in Moscow, Kiev, and Odessa. A man, the filmmaker, travels and documents life in a manner that is meant to produce an anti-narrative, for which Vertov was both hailed and criticized. For Vertov, it was important to visualize that “film could go anywhere,” whether into a woman’s private bedroom or the bustling streets. He sought to create a new visual language for cinema, devoid of unnecessary texts, and pioneered the concept of the Kino-Eye, which champions the agency of film as a transformative medium for human evolution. The human eye can only go so far, but the camera lens can go anywhere, and thus film does not only record, but also transforms.

Series Schedule:
All programs take place in the Helmut Stern Auditorium.
 
Saturday, February 6:
4:30 pm – October/Ten Days that Shook the World, Sergei Eisenstein, 1928 (103 minutes)
6:30 pm – Zvenigora, Aleksandr Dov×enko, Georgi Astafyev, and Vja?eslav Ov?innikov, 1927 (67 minutes)
 
Sunday, February 7:
4:30 pm- The Love Triangle/Bed and Sofa, Abram Room, 1927 (87 minutes)
6:15 pm- The Eleventh, Dziga Vertov, 1928 (52 minutes)
 
Friday, February 12:
4:30 pm – Branding the New Order: Soviet Constructivism, a panel discussion with exhibition curator Lehti Keelmann and U-M faculty.
6:30 – The Man with the Movie Camera, Dziga Vertov, 1926 (68 minutes)


Lead support for the exhibition Soviet Constructivist Posters: Branding the New Order and related programs is provided by the University of Michigan Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies and the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies.

Lead support for the exhibition Soviet Constructivist Posters: Branding the New Order is provided by the University of Michigan Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies and the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies.


categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Film



Special Event

Friday, February 12, 5–8 p.m.

All Galleries

Stop in to UMMA to enjoy special exhibitions, music, and engaging activities at Fridays After 5! With all of UMMA's galleries remaining open until 8pm, this exciting series provides an interactive atmosphere for all audiences. While you're here, browse the UMMA Store for a wide variety of specialty items. The Museum is always free.

Also, be sure to save the date for our upcoming Fridays After 5:

April 8, 2016
May 13, 2016
June 10, 2016
July 22, 2016

UMMA Fridays After 5 are generously supported by Comerica Bank and the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan. The media sponsor for Fridays After 5 is Michigan Radio.


Comerica Bank Logo


Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan Loto


Michigan Radio Logo

categories: Special Events

February 14

Guided Tour

Sunday, February 14, 1–2 p.m.

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent's approach and choice of objects is unique. 

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, February 14, 2–3 p.m.

During the 1920s the Soviet Union emerged on the world stage. The first decade was full of hope for a new social order.  A group of young artists known as Constructivists, spearheaded in part by Vladimir and Georgy Stenberg, championed an art that promoted the egalitarian ideals of the New Order and contributed to the growth of the Soviet Union. They advocated for a utilitarian art that spoke to the masses and their revolutionary aesthetic can still be seen in advertisements and other materials made for the public eye today. Among their most provocative and visionary works were posters advertising Soviet films. UMMA docents will introduce this exhibition that features posters by the Stenbergs and others for some of early cinema’s most inventive films.


categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

February 18



Thursday, February 18, 5:30–6:30 p.m.

Helmut Stern Auditorium
Free and open to the public.  Seating is first come, first serve.  

Angela Flournoy is the author of The Turner House, which is a finalist for the National Book Award and the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize. The novel was a Summer 2015 Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection, and a New York Times Sunday Book Review Editors' Choice. She is a National Book Foundation "5 Under 35" honoree. Her fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, and she has written for The New York Times, The New Republic and The Los Angeles Times. A graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, Flournoy has taught at the University of Iowa and The Writer's Foundry at St. Joseph's College in Brooklyn.

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from U-M alumna Helen Zell (’64). For more information, please see
lsa.umich.edu/writers/readingsevents/zellvisitingwritersseries
 






categories: Writers Series

February 19

Mark Webster Reading Series

Friday, February 19, 7–8 p.m.

Helmut Stern Auditorium
Free and open to the public.  Seating is first come, first serve. 

One MFA student of fiction and one of poetry, each introduced by a peer, will read their work. The Mark Webster Reading Series presents emerging writers in a warm and relaxed setting. We encourage you to bring your friends - a Webster reading makes for an enjoyable and enlightening Friday evening.

categories: UM Student Programs, Writers Series

February 21

Guided Tour

Sunday, February 21, 1–2 p.m.

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent's approach and choice of objects is unique. 

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, February 21, 2–3 p.m.

During the 1920s the Soviet Union emerged on the world stage. The first decade was full of hope for a new social order.  A group of young artists known as Constructivists, spearheaded in part by Vladimir and Georgy Stenberg, championed an art that promoted the egalitarian ideals of the New Order and contributed to the growth of the Soviet Union. They advocated for a utilitarian art that spoke to the masses and their revolutionary aesthetic can still be seen in advertisements and other materials made for the public eye today. Among their most provocative and visionary works were posters advertising Soviet films. UMMA docents will introduce this exhibition that features posters by the Stenbergs and others for some of early cinema’s most inventive films.


categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

February 27



Saturday, February 27, 11 a.m.–1 p.m.
Free. Registration is required: email umma-program-registration@umich.edu. Please include date and title of program in the subject line of your email. Indicate if you would like to register for the 11am session or the 2pm session and how many adults and children are in your group.

Create your own decorative stencils inspired by the traditional temple art in the South and Southeast Asian Art Gallery. Designed for families with children ages 6-12 to experience art together. Local artist and UMMA docent Susan Clinthorne will lead families on an exploration of the gallery followed by a hands-on workshop.

Family Art Studio is generously supported by the University of Michigan Credit Union, UMMA's Lead Sponsor for Student and Family Engagement.

categories: Artmaking, Family





Saturday, February 27, 2–4 p.m.

Multipurpose Room
Free. Registration is required: email umma-program-registration@umich.edu. Please include date and title of program in the subject line of your email. Indicate if you would like to register for the 11am session or the 2pm session and how many adults and children are in your group.

Create your own decorative stencils inspired by the traditional temple art in the South and Southeast Asian Art Gallery. Designed for families with children ages 6-12 to experience art together. Local artist and UMMA docent Susan Clinthorne will lead families on an exploration of the gallery followed by a hands-on workshop.

Family Art Studio is generously supported by the University of Michigan Credit Union, UMMA's Lead Sponsor for Student and Family Engagement.

categories: Artmaking, Family

February 28

Guided Tour

Sunday, February 28, 1–2 p.m.

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent's approach and choice of objects is unique. 

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, February 28, 2–3 p.m.

The announcement of the invention of photography in 1839 by Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre in Paris, and William Henry Fox Talbot in London, generated interest in the possibilities of this new technology as well as discussion of its merits, potential, and applications.  The first half-century of British photography charts the journey of a new medium with distinct expressive and artistic potentials.  Photography served as an aid to science and exploration but also captured aspects of British society in ways that are poetic and artistic.  Some photographers demonstrated an interest in social reform while others revealed sentimental notions of the island's remote past.  By the end of the century. advances in camera speeds and printing techniques facilitated landscape photography and other picturesque scenes.  UMMA docents will introduce the trajectory of Victorian photography on display in this exhibition.  


categories: Gallery Talks and Tours