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Programs and Tours

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March 1

Guided Tour

Sunday, March 1, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent's approach and choice of objects is unique. 

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, March 1, 2 pm - 3 pm

This exhibition, featuring rarely seen archival dried and pressed plant specimens, celebrates the upcoming 2015 opening of the new Medicinal Garden at the University of Michigan’s Matthaei Botanical Gardens. The earliest botanical garden at the University was a pharmaceutical garden established in 1897. The new garden, developed in partnership with the College of Pharmacy and Medical School faculty, aims to explore the botanical origins of historical and current medicines, and to promote a better understanding of the profound relationship between plants and human health. Docents will introduce this exhibition and connect these botanicals to other images of nature in UMMA’s permanent collection.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

March 8

Guided Tour

Sunday, March 8, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent's approach and choice of objects is unique. 

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, March 8, 2 pm - 3 pm

For more than 25 years, Los Angeles-based collectors Alan Hergott and Curt Shepard have built a world-class collection of contemporary art that is focused on men and male identity as its subject matter. The exhibition features more than 60 works by some of the most important names in late 20th and early 21st century art. The images are gathered into sections that examine the lives of men in contemporary Western societies—with all their contradictions—through themes of competition and solidarity, confrontation with identity, and diverse explorations of the body and sexuality (as both sign and experience). Join docents as they explore these themes.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours

March 10



Tuesday, March 10, 7 pm - 9 pm

Helmut Stern Auditorium

This film tells the story of several individuals who chose to stay in Fukushima, Japan  following the horrible earthquake that took place in the spring of 2011.  In the wake of this disaster, many used music and performance to express themselves.  Having lost almost everything, their commitment to music has been key to their endurance and evolution in their changed world.  From their inspiring sounds and stories, they show us the importance of finding and nurturing our own happiness.

The film is directed by artist, photographer, and filmmaker Toko Shiiki, with score by U-M Associate Professor of Music and Composition, Erik Santos. Work began on the film in the spring of 2013, and the film premieres at UMMA in time to commemorate the four-year anniversary of the earthquake.

This program is co-sponsored by UMMA and the U-M Center for Japanese Studies.

categories: Film

March 11

Special Event

Wednesday, March 11, 7 pm - 9 pm

Museum Apse

The Michigan Opera Theatre launches the first MOT Ann Arbor Opera Club, and you're invited to attend! Come enjoy this intimate highlights concert from the new MOT production of the opera Frida (music by Robert Xavier Rodriguez, book by Hilary Blecher, and lyrics by Migdalia Cruz). Catalina Cuervo as Frida Kahlo, brings the opera to life in concert form at UMMA. 

At age 18 Frida was badly injured in a traffic accident, which necessitated many medical procedures. Her recovery in isolation, as well as a lifetime in physical pain, profoundly influenced her paintings--some of the most compelling of the 20th century.

The opera celebrates Kahlo’s vivacious spirit, talent, sexuality, and fragility, with splashes of music as colorful as her artwork.  UMMA Senior Curator for Western Art, Carole McNamara, will kick off the evening with remarks on Kahlo's life and importance as an artist.

This program is free and open to the public. Seating is limited. Reception to follow.

For more information about the full production performances scheduled for the Macomb Center, the Berman Theatre, and the DIA, please contact the Michigan Opera Theatre.


categories: Performing Arts, Special Events

March 12

Zell Visiting Writers Series

Thursday, March 12, 5:10 pm - 7 pm

Helmut Stern Auditorium

Meet beloved author, Norton Juster! Best known for his classic children’s book, The Phantom Tollbooth, Mr. Juster will be available for a lively Q&A program, following a showing of the fascinating documentary, THE PHANTOM TOLLBOOTH: BEYOND EXPECATIONS. The film explores the creation, creators and lasting impact of one of the most universally beloved children’s books of our time. Mr. Juster will shed further light on the creative process and themes in the novel.

Reviews of The Phantom Tollbooth have appeared in many national publications including The New Yorker, which hailed the book as “a classic,” and The New York Times, which said “Norton Juster’s amazing fantasy has something wonderful for anybody old enough to relish the allegorical wisdom of Alice in Wonderland and the pointed whimsy of The Wizard of Oz.The Phantom Tollbooth has currently sold close to four million copies since its publication almost 50 years ago.

Born in June of 1929 in Brooklyn, New York, Norton Juster was an architect and planner, and is professor emeritus of design at Hampshire College. In addition to The Phantom Tollbooth, he has also penned a number of other highly acclaimed children’s books including The Dot and the Line, which was made into an Academy Award-winning animated film, and the recent The Hello, Goodbye Window, illustrated by Chris Raschka, which was awarded a Caldecott Medal. The musical adaptation of The Phantom Tollbooth, which was first introduced 15 years ago, continues to be performed in schools and theaters nationwide, and was recently produced at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC, touring the country for eight months.

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell(’64). For more information, please see www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp.

categories: Writers Series

March 15

Guided Tour

Sunday, March 15, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent's approach and choice of objects is unique. 

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, March 15, 2 pm - 3 pm

Inspired by a story by Czech writer Bohumil Hrabal, Czech photographer Hana Hamplová created a memorable body of work during the 1970s based on how important paper and the written word are to civilization—including how easily writings and, consequently knowledge, can be lost. Join docents as they introduce this exhibition inspired by the Frank Gehry chair made of cardboard in UMMA’s Design Gallery, and of and the need to address how artists from different cultures (present-day America and communist Czechoslovakia) view a commodity as common as paper.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Medicinal Plants and Gardens: Matthaei Botanical Gardens & Nichols Arboretum

Sunday, March 15, 3 pm - 3:45 pm

The Jan and David Brandon Family Bridge

This session is full. We have added a 4pm session to meet demand. Please register by emailing umma-program-registration@umich.edu.

Join David Michener, exhibition curator and Associate Curator at Matthaei Botanical Gardens & Nichols Arboretum, for a stroll through the visual history of the University of Michigan’s long-lost medicinal garden. Learn about its lasting impact on other academic units and its upcoming incarnation in a contemporary design. Narratives drawn from rarely seen archival specimens from the University Herbarium will highlight the profound relationship between plants and human health. Discover how renewed faculty interests at the intersection of health sciences, landscape architecture, contextual instruction and public engagement are leading to the 2015 opening of the new Medicinal Garden at the University of Michigan’s Matthaei Botanical Gardens.


This exhibition is part of the U-M Collections Collaborations series, co-organized by and presented at UMMA and designed to showcase the renowned and diverse collections at the University of Michigan. The U-M Collections Collaborations series is generously supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

categories: Artists and Curators, Exhibitions Related Program, Gallery Talks and Tours



Medicinal Plants and Gardens: Matthaei Botanical Gardens & Nichols Arboretum

Sunday, March 15, 4 pm - 4:45 pm

The Jan and David Brandon Family Bridge

This program is free and open to the public, however space is limited. Please email umma-program-registration@umich.edu to secure your place.

Join David Michener, exhibition curator and Associate Curator at Matthaei Botanical Gardens & Nichols Arboretum, for a stroll through the visual history of the University of Michigan’s long-lost medicinal garden. Learn about its lasting impact on other academic units and its upcoming incarnation in a contemporary design. Narratives drawn from rarely seen archival specimens from the University Herbarium will highlight the profound relationship between plants and human health. Discover how renewed faculty interests at the intersection of health sciences, landscape architecture, contextual instruction and public engagement are leading to the 2015 opening of the new Medicinal Garden at the University of Michigan’s Matthaei Botanical Gardens.


This exhibition is part of the U-M Collections Collaborations series, co-organized by and presented at UMMA and designed to showcase the renowned and diverse collections at the University of Michigan. The U-M Collections Collaborations series is generously supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

categories: Artists and Curators, Exhibitions Related Program, Gallery Talks and Tours

March 16



Monday, March 16, 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Helmut Stern Auditorium

Recently, renowned artist David Hockney observed that certain drawings and paintings from as early as the Renaissance seemed almost "photographic" in detail. Following an extensive visual investigation of western art of the past 1,000 years, he made the revolutionary claim that artists even of the prominence of van Eyck and Bellini must have used optical aids.  However, many art historians insisted there was no supporting evidence for such a remarkable assertion.  In this talk Charles M. Falco, PhD will show a wealth of optical evidence for his claim that he and Hockney subsequently discovered during an unusual, and remarkably productive, collaboration between an artist and a scientist. Falco will also discuss the imaging properties of the "mirror lens" (concave mirror), and some of the implications this work has for the history of science as well as the history of art (and the modern fields of machine vision and computerized image analysis).  These discoveries convincingly demonstrate optical instruments were in use (by artists, not scientists) nearly 200 years earlier than commonly thought possible, and account for the remarkable transformation in the reality of portraits that occurred early in the 15th century. (For more information see http://fp.optics.arizona.edu/ssd/art-optics/index.html)

Professor Charles Falco has joint appointments in Optical Sciences and Physics at the University of Arizona where he holds the UA Chair of Condensed Matter Physics. He is a Fellow of four professional societies (the American Physical Society, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the Optical Society of America, and the Society of Photo-optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)), has published more than 250 scientific manuscripts, co-edited two books, has seven U.S. patents, and has delivered over 400 invited talks at conferences, research institutions, and cultural organizations in 32 countries.  However, in addition to his scientific research, he was co-curator of the Solomon R. Guggenheim museum's "The Art of the Motorcycle" which, with over two million visitors in New York, Chicago, Bilbao, and the Guggenheim Las Vegas, was by far the most successful exhibition of industrial design ever assembled.  More recently, he and the world-renowned artist David Hockney found artists of such repute as van Eyck, Bellini, and Caravaggio used optical projections in creating portions of their work.  Three international conferences have been organized around these discoveries, and recognition for them includes the 2008 Ziegfield Lecture Award from the National Art Education Association.

categories: Special Events

March 17

Zell Visiting Writers Series

Tuesday, March 17, 6 pm - 7 pm

Museum Apse

Called “the Latino poet of his generation,” Martín Espada was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1957. He has published more than 15 books as a poet, editor, essayist, and translator. His latest collection of poems, The Trouble Ball (Norton, 2011), is the recipient of the Milt Kessler Award, a Massachusetts Book Award, and an International Latino Book Award. The Republic of Poetry (Norton, 2006) received the Paterson Award for Sustained Literary Achievement and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. A previous book of poems, Imagine the Angels of Bread (Norton, 1996), won an American Book Award and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Other poetry collections include A Mayan Astronomer in Hell’s Kitchen (Norton, 2000), City of Coughing and Dead Radiators (Norton, 1993), and Rebellion is the Circle of a Lover’s Hands (Curbstone, 1990). He has received other recognition such as the Shelley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America, the Robert Creeley Award, the PEN/Revson Fellowship, and a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship. His work has been widely translated; collections of his poems have been published in Spain, Puerto Rico, and Chile. His book of essays, Zapata’s Disciple (South End Press, 1998), has been banned in Tucson as part of the Mexican-American Studies Program outlawed by the state of Arizona. A graduate of Northeastern University Law School and a former tenant lawyer, Espada is currently a professor in the Department of English at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell(’64). For more information, please see www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp.

categories: Writers Series

March 19

Zell Visiting Writers Series

Thursday, March 19, 5:10 pm - 6:10 pm

Helmut Stern Auditorium

Called “the Latino poet of his generation,” Martín Espada was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1957. He has published more than 15 books as a poet, editor, essayist, and translator. His latest collection of poems, The Trouble Ball (Norton, 2011), is the recipient of the Milt Kessler Award, a Massachusetts Book Award, and an International Latino Book Award. The Republic of Poetry (Norton, 2006) received the Paterson Award for Sustained Literary Achievement and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. A previous book of poems, Imagine the Angels of Bread (Norton, 1996), won an American Book Award and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Other poetry collections include A Mayan Astronomer in Hell’s Kitchen (Norton, 2000), City of Coughing and Dead Radiators (Norton, 1993), and Rebellion is the Circle of a Lover’s Hands (Curbstone, 1990). He has received other recognition such as the Shelley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America, the Robert Creeley Award, the PEN/Revson Fellowship, and a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship. His work has been widely translated; collections of poems have been published in Spain, Puerto Rico, and Chile. His book of essays, Zapata’s Disciple (South End Press, 1998), has been banned in Tucson as part of the Mexican-American Studies Program outlawed by the state of Arizona. A graduate of Northeastern University Law School and a former tenant lawyer, Espada is currently a professor in the Department of English at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. Espada will be in conversation with U-M Associate Professor and MacArthur Fellow Khaled Mattawa.

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell(’64). For more information, please see www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp.

categories: Writers Series

March 20

Mark Webster Reading Series
Student Programs

Friday, March 20, 7 pm - 8 pm

Helmut Stern Auditorium

One MFA student of fiction and one of poetry, each introduced by a peer, will read their work. The Mark Webster Reading Series presents emerging writers in a warm and relaxed setting. We encourage you to bring your friends - a Webster reading makes for an enjoyable and enlightening Friday evening.

categories: UM Student Programs, Writers Series



Special Event

Friday, March 20, 7 pm - 10 pm
Whole Museum

The University of Michigan Museum of Art invites you to join us for an evening of art, music, and exploration. Drop in during this free community event to discover the permanent collections galleries and new special exhibitions including photographs exploring male identity in HE: The Hergott Shepard Photography Collection, meditations on the importance of paper by Czech artist Hana Hamplová, a visual history of the U-M’s medicinal garden, 3-D objects and their 2-D shadows in Flip Your Field, and the simultaneously surreal and deadpan film Guido van der Werve: Nummer veertien, home. Enjoy live music by Lauren Scales and the Big Blue—this Detroit-based vocalist blends jazz, soul, and R&B influences into a sound nothing short of breathtaking. Curators’ conversations and light refreshments round out the event.

categories: Special Events

March 21



Saturday, March 21, 11:15 am - 12 pm

Children ages four to seven are invited to hear a story in the galleries. Stories will be followed by a short activity responding to the art on display. Parents must accompany children. Siblings are welcome to join the group. Meet in front of the UMMA Store.
 
 


categories: Family, Gallery Talks and Tours

March 22

Guided Tour

Sunday, March 22, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent's approach and choice of objects is unique. 

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, March 22, 2 pm - 3 pm

For the third installation of the Flip Your Field series, Georgios Skiniotis, Professor of Biological Chemistry at U-M’s Life Sciences Institute and Medical School, was invited to be a Guest curator. Skiniotis creates three-dimensional models of cellular components by combining their magnified shadows or projections viewed from different perspectives. This exhibition juxtaposes three-dimensional objects from the Museum’s collection with two-dimensional projections created by Skiniotis and explores how we make the cognitive connection between a two-dimensional shadow and the three-dimensional object that casts it. Join docents and ponder this fascinating puzzle.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



HE: The Hergott Shepard Photography Collection

Sunday, March 22, 3 pm - 5 pm

Helmut Stern Auditorium

Collectors Alan Hergott and Curt Shepard will be joined by Mario Codognato, HE exhibition curator and chief curator, 21er Haus in Vienna, noted scholar Richard Meyer, Stanford University’s Robert and Ruth Halperin Professor in Art History, author of What Was Contemporary Art? and co-author of Art and Queer Culture, and Ann Goldstein, former Director of the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, and Senior Curator, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, for an exploration of masculinity and gender from varied perspectives.

Following the Dialogue, enjoy light refreshments, experience the exhibition, and attend the dance performance Men! Men! Men! in the Museum Apse.

Lead support for this exhibition is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost and the University of Michigan Health System. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Vice Provost for Equity, Inclusion, and Academic Affairs, Department of the History of Art, Institute for Research on Women and Gender, Institute for the Humanities, and Residential College, and the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program



HE: The Hergott Shepard Photography Collection

Sunday, March 22, 6 pm - 7:30 pm

Museum Apse

In conjunction with the UMMA exhibition of HE: The Hergott Shepard Photography Collection exploring themes of masculinity and gender, please join us for an evening of dance curated by Thurnau Professor and Rudolf Arnheim Distinguished University Professor of Dance Peter Sparling, and Nadine Hubbs, Professor of Women's Studies and Music and Director of the Lesbian-Gay-Queer Research Initiative, with assistance from dance dramaturg and MFA student Michael Parmelee.

This performance is generously supported by Prue and Ami Rosenthal.

Lead support for this exhibition is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost and the University of Michigan Health System. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Vice Provost for Equity, Inclusion, and Academic Affairs, Department of the History of Art, Institute for Research on Women and Gender, Institute for the Humanities, and Residential College, and the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund.

The SMTD@UMMA performance is made possible in part by the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund.

categories: Exhibitions Related Program, Performing Arts

March 26



Thursday, March 26, 5:10 pm - 6:10 pm

Michigan Theater
Historic Theater
603 E Liberty St
Ann Arbor, MI 48104

Tacita Dean’s film portraits express something that neither painting nor photography can capture. They are purely film. Dean‘s art is carried by a sense of history, time and place, light quality, and the essence of the film itself. The focus of her subtle but ambitious work is the truth of the moment, the film as a medium and the sensibilities of the individual. Dean’s solo exhibitions include Tate Britain, London; Schaulager, Basel; the Guggenheim Museum, New York; Nicola Trussardi Foundation, Milan; and MUMOK, Vienna. She was awarded the Hugo Boss Prize in 2006 and the Kurt Schwitters Prize in 2009. In 2011, she made FILM as part of the Unilever Series of commissions in Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall, which marked the beginning of her campaign to protect the medium of photochemical film (www.savefilm.org).  Other recent exhibitions include dOCUMENTA (13) (2012), Venice Biennale (2013), Berlin Biennale, and Biennale of Sydney (2014).

Unless otherwise noted, all programs take place on Thursdays at 5:10pm at the historic Michigan Theater, located at 603 E. Liberty Street in downtown Ann Arbor, and are free of charge and open to the public. This event is co-sponsored with the University of Michigan Museum of Art (UMMA).

categories: Artists and Curators



Zell Visiting Writers Series

Thursday, March 26, 6 pm - 7 pm

Forum
Museum Apse
This program is free and open to the public. Tickets are required for entry. Tickets are available through the Michigan Union Ticket Office (or 734-763-TKTS) beginning Thursday, February 26, 2015.

Kazuo Ishiguro is the author of Never Let Me Go; his novels have been translated into more than 40 languages. Kazuo Ishiguro’s seven previous books have won him wide renown and numerous honors. Both The Remains of the Day and Never Let Me Go have sold more than a million copies in print across platforms, and both were adapted into highly acclaimed films.

Book signing in the UMMA Forum from 5-6pm.




UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from UM alumna Helen Zell(’64). For more information, please see www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/mfa/mfaeve.asp.

categories: Writers Series

March 27



Friday, March 27, 6 pm - 7:30 pm

Michigan Union
Rogel Ballroom
530 South State Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Mr. Daniel Libeskind, a Polish-American architect born in 1946, is the founder of Studio Daniel Libeskind. As a child, Mr. Libeskind was a talented musician and performed on Polish television. In 1959, at 13 years old, Libeskind was the recipient of the American-Israel Cultural Foundation Scholarship to study music in Israel. He moved to New York with his family where he continued to foster his musical talent and perform. He later left the world of music to study architecture and received his professional architectural degree in 1970 from the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in New York City. He received a postgraduate degree in History and Theory of Architecture at the School of Comparative Studies at Essex University in England in 1972.

Mr. Libeskind has lived in New York, Toronto, Michigan, Italy, Germany, and Los Angeles and has taught at numerous universities including the University of Kentucky, Yale University, and the University of Pennsylvania, and is a visiting professor at the Leuphana University in Lüneburg, Germany.

He has received numerous awards and designed world-renowned projects including: the Jewish Museum in Berlin, the Denver Art Museum, the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, the Military History Museum in Dresden, and the master plan for Ground Zero, among others. Several of Daniel Libeskind’s projects are currently under construction, including CityLife, a project of re-qualification of the old fairgrounds district in Milan, which features a new urban park, as well as residential, office, retail, and cultural areas; and Zlota 44, a residential high-rise tower in Warsaw, Poland.

This lecture marks the 20-year anniversary of Daniel Libeskind's 1995 Raoul Wallenberg lecture.
Co-sponsorship of this lecture is made possible by the Jean & Samuel Frankel Center for Judaic Studies and the University of Michigan Museum of Art.

5pm reception in the Michigan Union Rogel Ballroom. Refreshments will be served.

categories: Special Events



Mark Webster Reading Series
Student Programs

Friday, March 27, 7 pm - 8 pm

Helmut Stern Auditorium

One MFA student of fiction and one of poetry, each introduced by a peer, will read their work. The Mark Webster Reading Series presents emerging writers in a warm and relaxed setting. We encourage you to bring your friends - a Webster reading makes for an enjoyable and enlightening Friday evening.

categories: UM Student Programs, Writers Series

March 29

Guided Tour

Sunday, March 29, 1 pm - 2 pm

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent's approach and choice of objects is unique. 

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Guided Tour

Sunday, March 29, 2 pm - 3 pm

This exhibition, featuring rarely seen archival dried and pressed plant specimens, celebrates the upcoming 2015 opening of the new Medicinal Garden at the University of Michigan’s Matthaei Botanical Gardens. The earliest botanical garden at the University was a pharmaceutical garden established in 1897. The new garden, developed in partnership with the College of Pharmacy and Medical School faculty, aims to explore the botanical origins of historical and current medicines, and to promote a better understanding of the profound relationship between plants and human health. Docents will introduce this exhibition and connect these botanicals to other images of nature in UMMA’s permanent collection.

categories: Gallery Talks and Tours



Hana Hamplova

Sunday, March 29, 3 pm - 4 pm

Photography Gallery
This program is free and open to the public, but space is limited. Please register to secure your place by emailing umma-program-registration@umich.edu.

Join curator Carole McNamara for a gallery talk on the photographs of Czech photographer Hana Hamplová.  This exhibition, consisting of 19 photographs from UMMA’s collection, is a meditation on the importance of paper and the written word to civilization—including how easily writings and, consequently, knowledge can be lost.

Lead support for the exhibition Meditations on Paper: Hana Hamplova is provided by the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment.  Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan Center for European Studies, Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, and the Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies.

categories: Artists and Curators, Exhibitions Related Program, Gallery Talks and Tours